Years later, Miss. still lacks civil rights museum





JACKSON, Miss. – Mississippi bred some of the worst violence of the civil rights era, yet nearly a half-century after a barrage of atrocities pricked the conscience of the nation, it's one of the few civil rights battleground states with no museum to commemorate the era.

Emmitt Till, a 14-year-old black boy, was bludgeoned to death for "sassing" a white woman and his body dumped in the Tallahatchie River in 1955. Mississippi NAACP Field Secretary Medgar Evers was gunned down outside his home by white sniper in 1963. And three young voter registration activists were murdered by the Ku Klux Klan during the Freedom Summer of 1964.

Such events forced the nation's eyes on the upheaval in the segregated South, and were pivotal in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965....


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