Jefferson's Books Found in U.S. University Library





ozens of Thomas Jefferson's books have been found in the rare books collection at Washington University in St. Louis.

Scholars are now poring through the 28 titles and 74 volumes, searching for the occasional handwritten note from the nation's third president. And librarians say it's possible more of Jefferson's books will be found in the school's collection.

The school announced the discovery Monday, on the Presidents Day holiday in the U.S.
Librarians say Jefferson's books were sold after his death to settle debts. His granddaughter, Ellen Wayles Randolph Coolidge, bid on many of the books....


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Jeff Schneider - 2/24/2011

Just to bring up an old point of contention, I was at a Gilder Lehrman seminar at the University of Virginia where I listened to a talk by the Librarian in charge of Jefferson's books. I asked her if she had ever seen a book by the Scottish philosopher, Francis Hutcheson. She said no, wondering what I could possibly be talking about. It was a question based on Garry Wills' fantasy that the Declaration of Independence was not based on John Locke but on Hutcheson. Of course Wills is a master of making arguments out of almost nothing. Anyone who reads the Second Treatise will find the Declaration in sentence after sentence. Wills had no basis for the argument intellectually, but I wonder if there is any Hutcheson in these "new" books. When is Wills going to retract his absurd attacks on Locke?


Jeff Schneider - 2/24/2011

Just to bring up an old point of contention, I was at a Gilder Lehrman seminar at the University of Virginia where I listened to a talk by the Librarian in charge of Jefferson's books. I asked her if she had ever seen a book by the Scottish philosopher, Francis Hutcheson. She said no, wondering what I could possibly be talking about. It was a question based on Garry Wills' fantasy that the Declaration of Independence was not based on John Locke but on Hutcheson. Of course Wills is a master of making arguments out of almost nothing. Anyone who reads the Second Treatise will find the Declaration in sentence after sentence. Wills had no basis for the argument intellectually, but I wonder if there is any Hutcheson in these "new" books. When is Wills going to retract his absurd attacks on Locke?

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