Long after a man’s brain helps make a scientific breakthrough, he is identified

tags: language, LiveScience, brains, aphasia



The identity of a mysterious patient who helped scientists pinpoint the brain region responsible for language has been discovered, researchers report.

The finding, detailed in the January issue of the Journal of the History of the Neurosciences, identifies the patient as Louis Leborgne, a French craftsman who battled epilepsy his entire life.

In 1840, a wordless patient was admitted to the Bicetre Hospital outside Paris for aphasia, or an inability to speak. He was essentially just kept there, slowly deteriorating. It wasn’t until 1861 that the man, who was known only as “Monsieur Leborgne” and who was nicknamed “Tan” for the only word he could say, came to physician Paul Broca’s ward at the hospital....



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