The OAH Announces Annual Prize Winners

Historians in the News
tags: awards, OAH, Organization of American Historians

Roy Rosenzweig Distinguished Service Award for an individual or individuals whose contributions have significantly enriched our understanding and appreciation of American history: Elaine Tyler May

Friend of History Award recognizes an institution or organization, or an individual working primarily outside college or university settings, for outstanding support of historical research, the public presentation of American history, or the work of the OAH: Made by History produces rigorous historical analysis of current events and public debates in an easily digestible format for the general public in partnership with the Washington Post. The combination offers a powerful platform for amplifying the work of historians for millions of readers around the world. Currently led by three historians—Kathryn Cramer Brownell (Purdue University), Carly Goodman (Writer and Historian), and Brian Rosenwald (University of   Pennsylvania)—Made by History has brought to the public the work of more than two thousand scholars since its founding in 2017. Nicole Hemmer was a cofounder of the site, and Keisha N. Blain is a past editor.

Frederick Jackson Turner Award for a first scholarly book dealing with some aspect of American history: Gabriel Winant, University of Chicago, The Next Shift: The Fall of Industry and the Rise of Health Care in Rust Belt America (Harvard University Press). With a vivid portrait of the transformation of Pittsburgh and the Rust Belt more generally, Gabriel Winant has written a stunning book regarding the remaking of the U.S. working class during the recent era of deindustrialization.

Merle Curti Intellectual History Award for the best book in American intellectual history: Emily Klancher Merchant, University of California, Davis, Building the Population Bomb (Oxford University Press). In this concise and memorable volume, Emily Klancher Merchant explores the history of population science in its sociopolitical, economic, ideological, and ethical dimensions. Building the Population Bomb offers a comprehensive interrogation of the data and assumptions at the heart of twentieth-century demographic work, which fueled popular concerns about overpopulation.

Look here for a full list of the awardees and judges and descriptions of the honored works and scholars. 

Read entire article at Organization of American Historians