Religions thrived to protect against disease





Religions thrived to protect our ancestors against the ravages of disease, according to a radical new evolutionary theory of the genesis of faith.

Prof Richard Dawkins the atheist and sceptic, has condemned religion as a "virus of the mind" but it seems that people became religious for good reason - actually to avoid infection by viruses and other diseases - according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, Biological Sciences.

Dr Corey Fincher and Prof Randy Thornhill of the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, come to this conclusion after studying why religions are far more numerous in the tropics compared with the temperate areas.


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Randll Reese Besch - 8/1/2008

That wasn't answered. Christians for the longest time refused to bathe because it was good for them to. They thought it vain and therefor against God's commandments. Somewhere down the line that changed and the religion changed to reinforce it. "Cleanliness is next of Godliness," came into use.

Dawkins is still right----it is the virus of the mind. However if humans don't improve it won't matter what they believe.

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