H-SHEAR running a forum on Daniel Walker Howe's recent Pulitzer-prize winning book, What Hath God Wrought





I am very pleased to announce that on Monday, H-SHEAR will begin publishing an eight-week serial forum on Daniel Walker Howe's recent Pulitzer-prize winning book, _What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848_.

H-SHEAR has commissioned seven distinguished scholars to write review essays on Howe's book that focus on their respective areas of expertise. Each Monday over the next seven weeks, one of these review essays will be posted to the list according to the schedule below. At the conclusion of the seven weeks, Professor Howe has graciously agreed to post a response to the entire forum. (Other book reviews will continue to appear irregularly throughout this eight-week period.)

SCHEDULE FOR FORUM ON _WHAT HATH GOD WROUGHT_

Oct. 27: James Huston (Oklahoma State University) on Economic History
Nov. 3: Michael A. Morrison (Purdue University) on Political History
Nov. 10: David Henkin (University of California-Berkeley) on the "Communications Revolution"
Nov. 17: Mary Ryan (Johns Hopkins University) on Women's History
Nov. 24: James Taylor Carson (Queen's University) on Native American History
Dec. 1: Manisha Sinha (Massachusetts-Amherst) on Race, Slavery, and African American History
Dec. 8: Bertram Wyatt-Brown (Emeritus, Univ. of Florida) on Religion and Reform
Dec. 15: Daniel Walker Howe Responds

Our intention in publishing this forum serially is to invite your participation in it. We encourage subscribers to jump in each week and comment on the essays by our reviewers, who have also been invited to watch the discussion and contribute in an ongoing way to the forum.

Once all of the reviews and Professor Howe's response have been published to the list, the entire forum will be archived permanently on the Web, together with links to any discussion threads that begin on the list about the book and/or the reviews. Our hope is that this unique--and uniquely interactive--forum will then be of use to future scholars and students of the early American republic.

Finally, I would like to take this opportunity to thank Professor Howe and all of the reviewers who have agreed to participate in this forum, and to thank all the loyal readers of H-SHEAR for making the list such a collegial and stimulating context for intellectual exchange.

Sincerely,
Caleb McDaniel
Co-Book Review Editor


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