Joseph Massad's book the subject of renewed criticism by Martin Kramer





In August 2006, I wrote a post entitled "Massad mystery at Harvard." There I asked why, for two years, Joseph Massad described his book Desiring Arabs as "forthcoming from Harvard University Press," only to announce that it would be published by the University of Chicago Press. I wrote the following:
Last spring [2006], Columbia promoted Massad to associate professor, a rank from which he could be tenured. Did the list of publications he submitted include Desiring Arabs as forthcoming from Harvard? If so, on what basis? What went wrong for Massad at Harvard University Press?...

Since Massad paraded the Harvard credential when he needed it, he should explain why it's evaporated. And if the elusive book figured in Columbia's promotion decision, the university should investigate Massad's conduct—again.

So did Columbia ever look into that Harvard mystery? Massad himself (perhaps in response to my post) gave his explanation in the acknowledgments to Desiring Arabs (pp. xiii-xiv). It turns out that it hinges on Edward Said:

Edward [Said] read drafts of three chapters of the book.... [During] the conference celebrating the twenty-fifth anniversary of Orientalism in April 2003, he asked me if I would be interested in publishing the book in his Harvard University Press (HUP) series. I was in disbelief of this unexpected praise. I prepared a proposal quickly and sent it to him and then forwarded it to the HUP editor. The HUP approved the contract for the book several months later, in September—two weeks before Edward's death.... He called me on his cellular phone from the car while on his way home from yet another chemotherapy treatment at the hospital. "Any word from Harvard?" he asked. I told him that I had just heard half an hour earlier. He was thrilled. I was ecstatic.

Unfortunately, a few weeks before production was set to begin, the HUP editor and I realized that we had differing visions for the book, and we parted ways.

So the mystery has begun to unravel. "Forthcoming from Harvard University Press" was yet another Columbia inside job. At the time, Edward Said was the general editor of an HUP book series entitled Convergences. HUP apparently accepted Massad's book provisionally for publication in Said's series, on the basis of the proposal and Said's reading of a few chapters. But after HUP had the complete manuscript—and Said was no longer editor of the series—its own editor rejected Massad's finished product. ("We parted ways" is an amusing euphemism.) Presumably, this decision would have been based, at least in part, upon readers' reports on the completed manuscript. (At university presses, anonymous peer review is a precondition of publication. All books accepted as proposals still must be vetted.)

The president and trustees of Columbia University, if they haven't already approved Massad's tenure, might well bear HUP's decision in mind. Absent Edward Said, Massad must be judged strictly on his own merit. And they might take some interest in precisely why Massad's book failed to make the cut at Harvard. "My books are not controversial at all in academe," Massad recently steamed in a tirade against a critic of Desiring Arabs, "and [to] the extent that I am said to be 'controversial' at all, I am so for the New York tabloid press and for Campus Watch, and now for some right-wing gay newspapers upset with my book." Well, at Harvard University Press, they were less than impressed.

Footnote: The latest on Massad's book comes from Dror Ze'evi in the American Historical Review. Ze'evi is the author of Producing Desire: Changing Sexual Discourse in the Ottoman Middle East, 1500-1900 (University of California Press). Money quote: "If Massad's evidence is to be trusted, then he is completely wrong in his conclusions." But move on, folks, no controversy here—at all.

Related Links

  • Martin Kramer: The hypocrisy of Massad 4/13/09


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