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Roundup



  • Why the Amazon Workers Never Stood a Chance

    by Erik Loomis

    "We may be in a period where economic justice concerns are more central to our politics than any time since the mid-20th century. But without a new round of labor law reform, organized labor cannot succeed."



  • All the President’s Historians

    by Daniel N. Gullotta

    Joe Biden's attraction to Jon Meacham's historical narratives of American ideals triumphant over adversity makes sense for a president dedicated to healing and reunification. 



  • How White Americans’ Refusal to Accept Busing has Kept Schools Segregated

    by Matthew D. Lassiter

    The legal distinction between "de facto" and "de jure" segregation has always been a convenient fiction allowing the perpetuation of segregation by obscuring the role of government in creating and sustaining a racially discriminatory housing market. 



  • The Men Who Turned Slavery Into Big Business

    by Joshua D. Rothman

    "We still live in the world that Franklin and Armfield’s profits helped build, and with the enduring inequalities that they and their industry entrenched."



  • Is America’s Longest Forever War Really Coming To An End?

    by Adam Weinstein and Stephen Wertheim

    The authors argue that Joe Biden has recognized that the US faces the choice of absolute withdrawal from Afghanistan or permanent entanglement. His resolve will be tested by inevitable bad news, but the time is now to move on from the policy of perpetual war. 



  • How To Make An Oligopoly

    by Brittany McWilliams

    A document from the Eli Lilly corporate archives shows how the pharmaceutical giant strategized to control the global market in insulin. 



  • Compliance Will Not Save Me

    by Ibram X. Kendi

    The idea that Black people can preserve their lives through absolute compliance with police is a vestige of the age of slavery and Jim Crow, but history shows that compliance has never secured safety under white supremacy. 



  • Why the Hope for Peace is Waning in Northern Ireland

    by James Waller

    "The Troubles, the decades-long Catholic uprising against British rule starting in the 1960s, began with Catholic frustration over a government that would not leave. If widespread violence returns, it will be because of Protestant frustration over a government that would not stay."



  • The Gatekeeper

    by Adam Tooze

    Paul Krugman's career as a politically influential economist has reflected the political dead end of the Clinton-era ideal of technocratic governing. His new book suggests that the intellectual authority of the economics profession may no longer prevent active government or deficit spending.