Blogs > Liberty and Power > Kelo protest

Jun 28, 2005 9:28 pm


Kelo protest



Jeff Jacoby has informed me that the Institute for Justice, the courageous organization that has defended the homeowners throughout the long legal journey ending in the Kelo decision, is sponsoring a protest at 6pm on Tuesday, July 5th, at the City Hall in New London, where the first public City Council meeting since the ruling will be held.

Hope you can make it!

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Stephan (K-dog) Kinsella - 7/14/2005

I don't mean to pettifog, and I do admire anyone trying to vindicate the rights of victims of the state (although we don't know if the Kelos are democrats or other type or socialist, or if they actually support the state's right of eminent domain in general, in which case their complaint is not highest on my list) -- and as I have said, even though I would oppose institutionally a system that gave the feds the power to overrule state laws like this, I would still fight for myself or clients any way I could to vindicate my or my client's rights. If I could use the feds to force the states to back off, I would--even though I am a federalist.

But my question is--what is courageous about the IJ did? Even if it is a good thing, and noble, what is actually courageous about it? I don't mean to pettifog, I am serious.


Stephan (K-dog) Kinsella - 7/14/2005

I don't mean to pettifog, and I do admire anyone trying to vindicate the rights of victims of the state (although we don't know if the Kelos are democrats or other type or socialist, or if they actually support the state's right of eminent domain in general, in which case their complaint is not highest on my list) -- and as I have said, even though I would oppose institutionally a system that gave the feds the power to overrule state laws like this, I would still fight for myself or clients any way I could to vindicate my or my client's rights. If I could use the feds to force the states to back off, I would--even though I am a federalist.

But my question is--what is courageous about the IJ did? Even if it is a good thing, and noble, what is actually courageous about it? I don't mean to pettifog, I am serious.

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