Blogs > Cliopatria > 2006 Cliopatria Awards Nominations: BEST SERIES OF POSTS

Dec 3, 2006 6:09 am


2006 Cliopatria Awards Nominations: BEST SERIES OF POSTS



2006 Nominations are Now Closed, thanks.
Look for the winners in January!

Please submit, in comments below, your nominations for the best blog post series by historians or about history published since 1 December 2005. [registration not required to post nominations, but the usual rules of civility and conduct still apply] Nominations will be accepted from November 1st through 30th.

Please include a URL for the posts (not just a URL for the blog). You many nominate as many posts or series as you wish in this category, and you may nominate individual blogs or bloggers in other categories as well.

If you want ideas of blogs or writers to nominate, see the History Blogroll or past editions of the History Carnival or itsrelatedcarnivals.

Bloggers do not need to be academic historians. If you're not sure whether a blog or blogger qualifies as"history," nominate them anyway and the judges will make a final determination. If you have questions, feel free to contact the chair of the committee:

Judging Committee: Nathanael Robinson (chair), Rebecca Goetz, Brandon Watson. [Judges are ineligible to win awards they are judging, but feel free to nominate them for something else!]

GO TO: 2006 Nominations Index, Best Group Blog, Best Individual Blog, Best New Blog, Best Post, Best Series of Posts, Best Writer


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HoloScholar - 12/2/2006

http://holocaustresearchproject.blogspot.com/2006/10/heart-holocaust-education-archive.html

Great new Blog!


Jonathan Dresner - 12/1/2006

Thanks for all the suggestions! Look for the winners at Cliopatria in January!


Jonathan Dresner - 11/29/2006

if this counts as a series, but the MIT controversy posts at Frog in a Well were pretty serious stuff:

me: http://www.froginawell.net/japan/2006/04/china-japan-historical-struggle-reaches-mit/
Alan Baumler: http://www.froginawell.net/china/2006/04/china-at-war/
http://www.froginawell.net/china/2006/04/japans-war-guilt/
and http://www.froginawell.net/china/2006/05/visualizing-cultures/
Winnie Wong:
http://www.froginawell.net/china/2006/05/more-on-mit-and-visualizing-cultures/
Finally, an update by me: http://www.froginawell.net/japan/2006/06/laughter-and-tears-on-the-charles/

I'm not sure if this counts as a series, either, but Alan Baumler and I have been blogging our syllabi
http://www.froginawell.net/china/2006/01/lumpy-chinese-history/
http://www.froginawell.net/china/2006/01/asia-on-the-move/
http://www.froginawell.net/china/2006/01/nomads-and-china/
http://www.froginawell.net/japan/2006/08/sharing-syllabi-japanese-women/
http://www.froginawell.net/china/2006/08/sharing-syllabi/


Rob MacDougall - 11/27/2006

Beat me to it.


Rob MacDougall - 11/27/2006

Also Moonbat and Aphra Behn (what's the deal with the pseudonyms over there?)'s four part series on the history of slavery: the most recent post links to its predecessors.


rluker - 11/17/2006

Polyglot Manifesto, I; Polyglot Manifesto, II


- 11/16/2006

Wow, what a tough field this is! I have four sterling examples of history series to add to this excellent list. They are as follows:

1. Mirrim's Magna Carta series (also cross-posted at My Left Wing). This excellent series on the history and text of the Runnymede document is five parts (so far), which can be found here, here, here. here, and here.

2. Unitary Moonbat's Nineteenth-Century American Politics series. A magnificent nine-part (so far) series on nineteenth-century American political history whose parts can be found here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here. (Also cross-posted at Daily Kos and Never In Our Names.)

3. Midtowng's monumental, and recently-completed, ten-part series on the History of Iraq. This series is a perfect example of the kind of history ProgressiveHistorians advocates: accurate, accessible, and relevant. Find all ten parts here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here. (Also cross-posted at Daily Kos.)

4. Finally, an excellent series by ePluribusMedia's Chris White and Avahome on FDR's Presidency. This series originated at ePluribusMedia and has been cross-posted some half-dozen places. All five parts are here, here, here, here, and here.

Thank you and good luck to everyone!

--Nonpartisan


Sharon Howard - 11/14/2006

http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/20396.html
http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/20428.html
http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/20531.html
http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/21016.html


- 11/5/2006

http://axisofevelknievel.blogspot.com/2006/04/countdown-to-audrey-series.html


Sergey Romanov - 11/2/2006

I'd like to nominate Debunking Ugly Voice videos at http://holocaustcontroversies.blogspot.com/


Sergey Romanov - 11/2/2006

I'd like to nominate Carlo Mattogno on Belzec Archaeological Research at http://holocaustcontroversies.blogspot.com/


Sergey Romanov - 11/2/2006

I'd like to nominate That's why it is denial, not revisionism at http://holocaustcontroversies.blogspot.com/


Sergey Romanov - 11/2/2006

I'd like to nominate What the Soviets knew about Auschwitz - and when at http://holocaustcontroversies.blogspot.com/


binky - 11/2/2006

Sunday Battleship blogging!


Robert M. Farley - 11/2/2006

http://lefarkins.blogspot.com/2004/12/sunday-battleship-blogging.html


DHI - 11/2/2006

Sunday Battleship Blogging by Robert M. Farley
http://lefarkins.blogspot.com/2004/12/sunday-battleship-blogging.html


DHI - 11/2/2006

Sunday Battleship Blogging by Robert M. Farley
http://lefarkins.blogspot.com/2004/12/sunday-battleship-blogging.html


David H. Noon - 11/1/2006

Erik at Alterdestiny has a fine series of posts that examine people whose historical contributions have been generally neglected. Recent entires have included Myles Horton, The Cahokia Peoples, Diane Nash, James H. Carleton, and Philip Vera Cruz.


David H. Noon - 11/1/2006

Rob at Lawyers, Guns and Money has a fantastic weekly series on battleships -- I'm not a military buff at all, but these posts are always fascinating...


Martin Rundkvist - 11/1/2006

For best blog post series, I hereby nominate:

Archaeoastronomy's on-man blog carnival "Vidi".

http://archaeoastronomy.wordpress.com/2006/10/29/vidi-6/
http://archaeoastronomy.wordpress.com/2006/10/21/vidi-5/
http://archaeoastronomy.wordpress.com/2006/10/10/vidi-4/
http://archaeoastronomy.wordpress.com/2006/10/06/vidi-3/
http://archaeoastronomy.wordpress.com/2006/09/16/vidi-2/
http://archaeoastronomy.wordpress.com/2006/09/09/vidi/


Alun Salt - 11/1/2006

Here's> a few examples.

Rather than just say "Here's a pot, it's nice." Duane Smith is trying to show the historical context of pottery finds. Put the series together and you have a regular commentary on the Levant in antiquity.

I look forward to reading the next in the series, which is surely a helpful quality for a "Best Series" award.

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