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Mar 3, 2004 10:35 pm


Now, THIS Should Be Interesting ...



Cliopatria welcomes Derek Catsam and Michael Tinkler to its group.

Derek Catsam is from New Hampshire and, bear with us, he is a Red Sox fan. Williams College and Catsam agree that he ill-spent his youth there, majoring in history and political science, captaining its championship track and field team, and singing in the Williams Octet, an a cappella group. He continues to sing with a DC group, Fair Game. Derek did graduate work at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, Rhodes University in South Africa, and Ohio University in American and South African history. Catsam is a fellow at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, finishing a book on the Freedom Rides for Louisiana State University Press. An associate editor of Safundi: The Journal of South African & American Comparative Studies, Derek is well known at HNN both for his fine articles and spirited engagements on the comment boards. He places himself somewhere to"the left of the New Republic but to the right of the Nation". Being a historian does not save him from illusions: he believes the Red Sox will do it this year and joins Cliopatria"to set that &*#%$@ Luker straight on a few matters." Do, someone, buy the poor man a webpage. We have no netlink for him.

Fortunately, Michael Tinkler will maintain some sense of balance at Cliopatria. Better known on the net as the Cranky Professor, Tinkler teaches Art History at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, New York. He is, however, a man of the South, a native of Tennessee, and graduate in Classics from Rice University. Unwittingly, he absorbed wisdom by walking past Atlanta's Luker estate 10 or 12 times a week while pursuing his doctorate at Emory University. Tinkler's teaching and research interests are in ancient and medieval art history, Islamic art and architecture, and women and art in the middle ages. And, shh, the Cranky One is said to be a" conservative."

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