Blogs > Cliopatria > 2008 Cliopatria Award Nominations: BEST SERIES OF POSTS

Dec 1, 2008 8:08 am


2008 Cliopatria Award Nominations: BEST SERIES OF POSTS



Nominations are now closed. Winners will be posted here when they are announced at the AHA in January

Please submit, in comments below, your nominations for the best blog post series by historians or about history published since 1 December 2007. [registration not required to post nominations, but the usual rules of civility and conduct still apply] Nominations will be accepted from November 1st through 30th.

Please include a URL for the posts (not just a URL for the blog). You many nominate as many posts or series as you wish in this category, and you may nominate individual blogs or bloggers in other categories as well.

If you want ideas of blogs or writers to nominate, see the History Blogroll or past editions of the History Carnival or its related carnivals.

Bloggers do not need to be academic historians. If you're not sure whether a blog or blogger qualifies as"history," nominate them anyway and the judges will make a final determination. If you have questions, feel free to contact Ralph Luker or leave a comment here.

Judging Committee: Manan Ahmed, Another Damned Medievalist, Rebecca Goetz
[Judges are ineligible to win awards they are judging, but feel free to nominate them for something else!]

Navigation: 2008 Nominations Home Page, Best Group Blog, Best Individual Blog, Best New Blog, Best Post, Best Series of Posts, Best Writer, Previous Winners


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Jonathan Dresner - 12/1/2008

Nominations are now closed. Winners will be posted here when they are announced at the AHA in January


LPG - 11/30/2008

My apologies. I neglected to provide a link to the final post in the series so will do so by providing the complete nomination below.

----

I would like to nominate a series of posts on Civil War Railroads on the blog wigwags at http://wigwags.wordpress.com. The first was a collaboration between military history graduate student Rene Tyree and rail historian, Peter A. Hansen. The second, third, and forth were written by Rene Tyree.

The entire series can be accessed here.
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/popular-series/civil-war-railroads/

Each of the individual posts can be accessed as noted below.

1) "Were the North and Sound Evenly Matched on the Rails?"
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/2008/01/19/were-the-north-and-south-evenly-matchedon-the-rails/

2) "Railroad Generalship"
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/2008/01/20/216/

3) "Stewards of Civil War Railroads - Part I Lincoln"
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/2008/05/24/stewards-o-civil-war-railroads-part-i/

4) "Stewards of Civil War Railroads - Part II Davis"
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/2008/05/26/stewards-of-civil-war-railroads-part-ii/

5) "Stewards of Civil War Railroads - Part III"
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/2008/05/28/stewards-of-civil-war-railroads-part-iii/


LPG - 11/30/2008

I would like to nominate a series of posts on Civil War Railroads on the blog wigwags at http://wigwags.wordpress.com. The first was a collaboration between military history graduate student Rene Tyree and rail historian, Peter A. Hansen. The second, third, and forth were written by Rene Tyree.

The entire series can be accessed here.
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/popular-series/civil-war-railroads/

Each of the individual posts can be accessed as noted below.

1) "Were the North and Sound Evenly Matched on the Rails?"
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/2008/01/19/were-the-north-and-south-evenly-matchedon-the-rails/

2) "Railroad Generalship"
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/2008/01/20/216/

3) "Stewards of Civil War Railroads - Part I Lincoln"
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/2008/05/24/stewards-o-civil-war-railroads-part-i/

4) "Stewards of Civil War Railroads - Part II Davis"
http://wigwags.wordpress.com/2008/05/26/stewards-of-civil-war-railroads-part-ii/


Alun Salt - 11/26/2008

I'm going to grab the 'highlight work that others might not have seen' baton and point to Le Site d'Irna as my nomination. I'm nominating with mixed feelings, because every time I mention the subject I get angry visitors. Some people just hate it when you rule out alien intervention as an explanation for archaeological remains, purely due to lack of evidence. To a large extent the world is bored of the B0snian pyram1ds. It's old news. Yet still he keeps digging and destroying more and more of the irreplaceable past. Irna with her series of posts has kept a chronicle of what has been going in the Balkans. It's a thankless task, at least for now but I'm entirely serious when I say her posts are of historic importance. This will be valuable material when someone wants to talk about the 'equal validity of different ways of knowing.' It's the only place I know of where the extra-terrestrial hunting pseudoarchaeologists have been given carte blanche on a site of archaeological importance.

The posts are:


It's a shame she's had to write them, but she has written them well and they deserve recognition.


RH Kruger - 11/26/2008

My apologies. Thank you. I'm 56 years old (will be 57 in 2 weeks)and still getting used to this computer stuff.


Jonathan Dresner - 11/26/2008

The nomination wasn't deleted: you posted it under the wrong category. It's still there; we do not have the ability to move comments from one post to another.


RH Kruger - 11/26/2008

I would like to nominate the Blog Post Series: “Jefferson and Slavery: Thoughts in Black and White” over on The Jefferson Project. It presents a 3-part multi-racial study on Thomas Jefferson, slavery, and his memory: w/ Part 1 by Liane DiStefano, Part 2 by Christopher Williams, and Part 3 by Michael Aubrecht. Thank you.

Read here: http://www.pinstripepress.net/TJblog/index.blog/1347911/jefferson/


Daniel Sauerwein - 11/23/2008

I would like to nominate a series of posts written by my father on our blog Frontier Battles. The overall series title is called "BATTLE OF FALLEN TIMBERS CONFIRMS AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE" and is divided into five parts.

Part I: http://frontierbattles.wordpress.com/2008/09/20/battle-of-fallen-timbers-confirms-american-independence-part-i/

Part II: http://frontierbattles.wordpress.com/2008/09/28/battle-of-fallen-timbers-confirms-american-independence-part-ii/

Part III: http://frontierbattles.wordpress.com/2008/11/21/battle-of-fallen-timbers-confirms-american-independence-part-iii/

Part IV: http://frontierbattles.wordpress.com/2008/11/22/battle-of-fallen-timbers-confirms-american-independence-part-iv/

Conclusion: http://frontierbattles.wordpress.com/2008/11/23/battle-of-fallen-timbers-confirms-american-independence-conclusion/

The gap is due to him being extremely busy and working two jobs. I hope you all enjoy it.


Anthony Vaver - 11/12/2008

www.earlyamericancrime.com/category/convict-transportation">http://www.earlyamericancrime.com/www.earlyamericancrime.com/category/convict-transportation

A continuing series on convict transportation from Great Britain to the American colonies.


Jeremy Young - 11/12/2008

Sorry for the triple post, but the link for Part 2 in my original comment didn't work; it can be found here.


Jeremy Young - 11/11/2008

And a second nomination: at Edwired, Mills Kelly's series on the future of the AHA.


Jeremy Young - 11/11/2008

This nomination was by me, Jeremy Young -- I don't know why it showed up as my login name rather than my real name.


jcytense - 11/11/2008

At ProgressiveHistorians, Ralph Brauer's three-part series on Bill Clinton and the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act:

1 2 3


Tim Hitchcock - 11/7/2008

http://digitalhistoryhacks.blogspot.com/

Posted: 24 May 2008 through 3 July 2008.

'A Naive Bayesian in the Old Bailey, Parts 1 - 14'. This series describes the creation of an intellectual tool for historical analysis that will allow us to move beyond iterative searching and flat analysis.


J J Cohen - 11/6/2008

For best series, how about the innovative "Learning Old English" series at Unlocked Wordhoard?


Viv Laberge - 11/6/2008

Please consider Tim Abbott's series based on family history and Jonathan Trumbulls "The Death of General Montgomery in Attack on Quebec, December 31 1775"

Part I - False Memories of True Patriots

http://greensleeves.typepad.com/berkshires/2008/01/false-memories.html

Part II - Where's Aaron?: Curious Omissons and Inclusions in Trumbull's Deat of Mongomery:

http://greensleeves.typepad.com/berkshires/2008/01/wheres-aaron-cu.html

Part III - If My Heart, My Life or My Fortune Can Assist You, It Is Yours;" Aaron Burr and Matthias Ogden at Quebec:

http://greensleeves.typepad.com/berkshires/2008/01/aaron-burr-and.html

Part IV - Ogden and Burr and the Fog of War:

http://greensleeves.typepad.com/berkshires/2008/01/ogden-and-burr.html

Part V - "Weep America, For Thou Hast Lost One of Thy Most Virtuous and Bravest Sons";

http://greensleeves.typepad.com/berkshires/2008/01/weep-america-fo.html


Sherree Tannen - 11/4/2008

The posts referred to above are as follows: the piercing examination by Kevin Levin of Civil War Memory of the current portrayal, in both scholarly and popular history, of "black" Confederates, and posts concerning the meaning of the Confederate flag by Robert Moore of Cenantua. Thank you.


Suzanne - 11/3/2008

Bill Turkel's 14-part A Naive Bayesian in the Old Bailey. http://digitalhistoryhacks.blogspot.com/2008/05/naive-bayesian-in-old-bailey-part-1.html
I'm sure if I had followed along closely I would be able to use data mining very effectively in my research.


Sherree Tannen - 11/3/2008

I would like to nominate Robert Moore of Cenantua and Kevin Levin of Civil War Memory for best series of posts.

Thank you.


richlanders - 11/2/2008

Soldier’s Mail: Letters Home from a New England Soldier 1916-1919

http://worldwar1letters.wordpress.com

This blog was started on Memorial Day, 2008 and features the writings home of Sgt. Samuel E. Avery during the time of the First World War from 1916-1919 while first serving with the 8th Mass. Infantry during the Mexican Border campaign (1916) and then with the 103rd U.S. Infantry (26th Division) in France as part of the AEF.

Sgt. Avery was a prolific writer and his words home form a fascinating narrative of eyewitness history from the hot sands along the Rio Grande to the cold mud along the Meuse. His letters are published on the date they were actually written 91 years ago and they have developed a devoted readership in the short time this blog has been active.

Other features of this blog include rare photos from the Avery Collection, maps, original recordings of period music and numerous links to other resources of interest to the student of military history and American involvement in World War I. The editor has constructed the pages with care to help create a historical background with which to understand each piece of correspondence as part of chapters in a sweeping personal story.

Going forward this site will also feature letters Sgt. Avery received from the Home Front which are more rare in the genre since soldiers in the field had limited means by which to preserve them.

The editor is a former High School history teacher, B.A. Magna Cum Laude, Drew University 1985, M.A.T. Tufts University 1989.


Jim - 11/2/2008

Family Connections of U.S. Grant
http://civilwarnotebook.blogspot.com/2008/04/family-connections-of-ulysses-s-grant.html

Ancestors & Decendants of Ulysses S. & Julia (Dent) Grant
http://civilwarnotebook.blogspot.com/2008/09/ancestors-descendants-of-ulysses-s.html


Kevin Levin - 11/2/2008

I want to second Nick's nomination for Airminded.


Nick - 11/2/2008

I nominate Airminded's series of posts on the Sudeten crisis.

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