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Apr 5, 2009 5:43 am


Sunday's Notes



History Carnival is in need of hosts for May and through the summer months. If you'd like to do it, contact Sharon Howard at sharon*at*earlymodernweb*dot*org*dot*uk.

Tom Holland,"The Revolt That Ravaged An Empire," Washington Post, 5 April, reviews Barry Strauss's The Spartacus War.

Adam Kirsch,"Sealed with a Kiss," NYT, 3 April, reviews Susan Gubar's Judas: A Biography.

Claire Tomalin,"A Woman for All Seasons," NYT, 2 April, reviews John Guy's A Daughter's Love: Thomas More and His Dearest Meg.

Ben Hoyle,"Handel 'was binge eater and problem drinker'," London Times, 2 April, previews"Handel Reveal'd," an exhibit that opens this week at London's Handel House Museum.

Martha A. Sandweiss,"Invisible Woman," Washington Post, 5 April, reviews Lea VanderVelde's Mrs. Dred Scott: A Life on Slavery's Frontier.

Susan Dominus,"The Past as Peep Show," NYT, 2 April, reviews Kat Long's The Forbidden Apple: A Century of Sex and Sin in New York City and Donna Dennis's Licentious Gotham: Erotic Publishing and Its Prosecution in Nineteenth-Century New York.

Adam Kirsch,"Life On Venus: Europe's Last Man," World Affairs, Spring, features the speculation of late 19th century intellectuals that bourgeois culture would destroy the human spirit.

20th Century Notes below the fold ...

Joseph O'Neill,"I'll Go On," NYT, 2 April, reviews Martha Dow Fehsenfeld and Lois More Overbeck, eds., The Letters of Samuel Beckett: Volume I: 1929-1940.

Patricia Cohen,"New Deal Revisionism: Theories Collide," NYT, 3 April, reports on a conference organized by Amity Shlaes and co-sponsored by New York's Council on Foreign Relations and NYU's Leonard N. Stern School of Business.

Jeffrey Gettleman,"A Wound in the Heart of Africa," NYT, 2 April, reviews Gérard Prunier's Africa's World War: Congo, the Rwandan Genocide, and the Making of a Continental Catastrophe.

Suzanne Dailey,"Who is Thabo Mbeki?" NYT, 2 April, reviews Mark Gevisser's A Legacy of Liberation: Thabo Mbeki and the Future of the South African Dream.

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