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immigration



  • Immigrants, Trump, Pope Francis, and Two Films

    by Walter G. Moss

    Two recent films evoke Pope Francis's message opposing insular nationalism, a stance which echoes the inclusionary nationalism of the abolitionist Frederick Douglass. 



  • French Academics Fear Becoming Scapegoats in War on Terrorism

    The killing of a social studies teacher has opened French academics to accusations of supporting radical Islamists and undermining France's policy of national secularism; those who turn a critical lens to French colonialism and racism in contemporary France have received sharp criticism from nationalist and center-right politicians.


  • Recognizing an Unrecognized Chinese American WWII Veteran

    by A.J. Wong

    In December, Congress honored all Chinese American World War II veterans with the Congressional Gold Medal, and some of their families will be eligible to receive a replica medal in their names. Hoy You Lim (林開祐) was killed in action in France in 1944. None of his survivors could complete the paperwork to receive his medal. The granddaughter of another Chinese American veteran wants to recognize his service. 



  • A Lesser-Known Trump Immigration Policy Needs Biden’s Attention

    by Smita Ghosh

    Biden should reverse the Trump policy of using "expedited removal" to deport migrants without a hearing, which is part of a historical pattern of deportation programs that harm communities, separate families, and sometimes result in legal residents being expelled from the United States.



  • Trump Looms Large Now, but Maybe Not Forever

    by Steve Inskeep

    NPR's Steve Inskeep reflects on the prospect that historical distance will make Trump and Trumpism smaller (and not all-consuming) parts of a story about American society struggling with bigger questions of political, economic and social equality that became increasingly contentious during the Obama era. 



  • Why New York’s Mob Mythology Endures

    by Adam Gopnik

    "Generally, in Mob stories, the cute bits are not real, and the real bits are not cute. Given that grim truth, there’s something to be said for just shutting your eyes and repeating the cute bits." Some new books on the Mafia unfortunately follow the pattern. 



  • A Teacher, His Killer and the Failure of French Integration

    The murder of a French social studies teacher who showed his multiethnic class images offensive to Islam illustrates the dilemma of the French policy of secularism, which is beset on one side by complaints that immigrants do not assimilate and on the other by rising xenophobia and racism.



  • Sanctuary Unmasked: The First Time Los Angeles (Sort of) Became a City of Refuge

    by Paul A. Kramer

    Los Angeles’s first sanctuary law grew out of the refugee wave that had brought Alicia Rivera to the city. By 1982, an estimated 200,000 to 300,000 refugees from El Salvador — a country with fewer than 5,000,000 people — and tens of thousands of Guatemalans had fled to the United States to escape murder, poverty, and starvation.