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evolution


  • Originally published 08/07/2013

    Scopes was a willing 'guinea pig'

    On May 26, 1925, The New York Times’ front page featured a story from Tennessee that would become one of the most famous court trials in our history.“John T. Scopes, young Dayton (Tenn.) high school teacher, tonight stands indicted for having taught the theory of evolution to students attending his science classes in violation of a law passed by the Tennessee Legislature and signed by the Governor on March 21, 1925. … The hearing of the case will bring many notables to the little mountain town, including William Jennings Bryan for the prosecution and Clarence Darrow of Chicago and Dudley Field Malone of New York for the defense.”...

  • Originally published 02/04/2013

    Darwin’s birds get new look

    In 1855, Charles Darwin took up a new hobby. He started raising pigeons....Pigeon breeding, Darwin argued, was an analogy for what happened in the wild. Nature played the part of the fancier, selecting which individuals would be able to reproduce. Natural selection might work more slowly than human breeders, but it had far more time to produce the diversity of life around us.Yet to later generations of biologists, pigeons were of little more interest than they are to, say, New Yorkers. Attention shifted to other species, like fruit flies and E. coli.Now Michael D. Shapiro, a biologist at the University of Utah, is returning pigeons to the spotlight....

  • Originally published 06/23/2012

    What Historians Can Learn from the Social Sciences and Sciences

    Macaulay famously said that history is not the rival of the sciences, it's the house in which science and literature and the arts all dwell.  This page is designed to help historians keep up with the sciences so we can keep our house up-to-date.

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