;

Lost Cause



  • Women’s Clubs and the “Lost Cause”

    Women’s clubs were popular after the Civil War among white and Black women. But white clubwomen used their influence to ingrain racist curriculum in schools.



  • Setting the Lost Cause on Fire

    by Karen L. Cox

    Once revered by their communities, the United Daughters of the Confederacy today are simply out of step with change sweeping the South and the nation.



  • Arkansas History Books Carried Rebel Slant

    Arkansas historians Kenneth Barnes and Carl H. Moneyhon discuss the political influence of Confederate sympathizers and white supremacy over the content of history books in the state. 



  • Europe in 1989, America in 2020, and the Death of the Lost Cause

    by David W. Blight

    We should not celebrate too much as monuments topple and old slave-auction blocks are removed. History did not end when the Soviet Union dissolved, and it will not end now, even if a vibrant movement sweeps a new age of civil rights into America. Most of all, we must remember what the Lost Cause is and was before we try to call it past.



  • A University’s Betrayal of Historical Truth

    by David W. Blight, W. Fitzhugh Brundage, Kevin M. Levin

    The University of North Carolina agreed to pay the Sons of Confederate Veterans $2.5 million—a sum that rivals the endowment of its history department.


  • The Origins of the Lost Cause Myth

    by M. Andrew Holowchak

    States’ rights and slavery, while theoretically distinct, were in praxis intertwined. Here's what a Jeffersonian analysis of Jubal Early’s lost-cause apologia can teach us.