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archives



  • Where are the Women in History?

    by Amanda B. Moniz

    Women's histories have frequently been written in the past, but in ways that are inaccessible to researchers in the present. One example is the way that women reformers were presented as exemplars of Protestant evangelical rectitude. 



  • Eve Babitz's Archive Reveals the Person Behind the Persona

    by Kevin Dettmar

    "What could the personal documents of a writer who was so public about her private world teach us about her work? How much of that persona was a performance and how much a reflection of her real anxieties and ambitions?"



  • Library of Congress will Acquire Neil Simon's Papers

    Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden expressed gratitude to Simon's widow Elaine Joyce Simon for the donation, which enhances the library's holdings in performance arts and ensures future researchers will be able to access his work. 



  • 30-Year Flatline in NARA Budget Threatens Research, Transparency

    Chronic underfunding, combined with successive administrations' disdain for transparency, means that Freedom of Information Act requests are likely to languish for years before being fulfilled. It's long overdue to fund the National Archives for the public good. 



  • Russia's Invasion is Targeting Ukraine's History Too

    by Alexandra Sukalo

    The destruction of historical archives in Ukraine is part and parcel of a long tradition of attempted cultural eradication in service of empire. 



  • Man of Smoke

    by Jason Ridler

    The task of literary biography can be made much more difficult when authors fictionalize the sparse details of their own lives. 


  • A Walk Around the "Wood that Built London"

    by C.J. Schüler

    The remnants of the North Wood outside London posed a mystery of cartographical history to the author: how to reconstruct the forest that was timbered to build the metropolis.



  • Climate Change Threatens Smithsonian

    “We’re kind of in trial and error,” said Ryan Doyle, a facilities manager at the Smithsonian. “It’s about managing water.”