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censorship



  • Book Bans Reflect Outdated Views on How Children Read

    by Trisha Tucker

    Research shows that children are not vessels into which books pour ideas, but co-creators of meaning as they read and process a book. Yet today's moral panic imagines books breaking down barriers between innocent childhood and a corrupt world. 



  • American Library Association: Book Bans Accelerating

    “It represents an escalation, and we’re truly fearful that at some point we will see a librarian arrested for providing constitutionally protected books on disfavored topics,” said Deborah Caldwell-Stone, the director of the office of intellectual freedom at the library association.



  • Today's Book Bans Might be Most Dangerous Yet

    by Jonna Perrillo

    Today's book banners have broadened their attention from communist themes in textbooks and are attacking young adult literature titles that students are choosing to read, a much more significant intrusion on freedom of thought. 



  • PEN America: The Nation's Censored Classrooms

    by Jeremy C. Young and Jonathan Friedman

    "The restrictions and chilling effects of gag order laws threaten to destroy the climate of open inquiry required in free and democratic educational institutions."



  • States Curtailing Students' Access to Books, Ideas

    In many states, school librarians will be less free to recommend books, and students less free to explore them, with potentially serious consequences for educational quality and personal and intellectual growth, experts argue. 



  • Texas District Removes Graphic Version of Diary of Anne Frank

    “It’s disgusting. It’s devastating. It’s legitimate book banning, there’s no way around it,” Laney Hawes, a parent of four children in the Keller district, told JTA about the order. “I feel bad for the teachers and the librarians.”



  • Fighting Back Against Book Banners

    by Margaret Sullivan

    Attempts to ban books from public libraries are a threat to democratic culture and should alarm all Americans, argues Post columnist Margaret Sullivan. 



  • The Next Front of the Culture War? Your Public Library

    "Conservative activists in several states, including Texas, Montana and Louisiana have joined forces with like-minded officials to dissolve libraries’ governing bodies, rewrite or delete censorship protections, and remove books outside of official challenge procedures."



  • PEN Report: More than 1,000 Books Banned in US

    PEN found that 86 school districts had removed 1,145 titles from their shelves over the last nine months, some permanently and others while an investigation was under way.



  • My Life With Maus

    by Tom Engelhardt

    Although the aftermath of the Tennessee "Maus" controversy involved a flood of donated copies sent to the local community and the book's return to the bestseller charts, the revival of book-banning sentiments bodes ill for the course of the nation. 



  • Book Bans Target Teaching the History of Oppression

    by Marilisa Jiménez Garcia

    Children, particularly those who are part of minority groups, have never been spared from horrors, in history or today. The rhetoric of book-banners is rooted in a privileged viewpoint and serves the interests of inequality today.



  • Now Conservatives are the "Discomfort Police"

    by Jeffrey Aaron Snyder

    The left should not be surprised to see the right weaponizing the concept of discomfort to justify a spate of legislation restricting the teaching of difficult historical subjects around race and historical conflict. 



  • Maus in Tennessee

    by Jeet Heer

    The stated objections to Maus – profanity, nudity, filial disrespect, violence – are impossible to separate from the fact that the book is a graphic history of the Holocaust.