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Republican Party



  • There Are Two Ways America Can Go After January 6

    by Thomas Zimmer

    In some respects, the January 6 attack resembles the failed 1923 Beer Hall Putsch. What should concern us is what could happen if the Justice Department decides to give similarly lenient treatment to the Capitol conspirators and their leader. 



  • Republicans Were Trumpy Long Before Trump

    by Nicole Hemmer

    Although he ran as an independent, Ross Perot's 1992 presidential campaign raised questions about how the Republican Party would position itself in the post cold-war world. That same year, Pat Buchanan started to provide answers. 



  • Chait: GOP Door is Now Open to Antisemites

    Since World War II, antisemitic conspiracists have been persona non grata in the party. Now, as the Republicans seek to govern with a shrinking share of the electorate, they're taking any help they can get. 



  • It's Not Trump's GOP, it's Pat Buchanan's

    by Nicole Hemmer

    Republicans have come around to Pat Buchanan's vision of a hard-right, pessimistic and grievance-driven party. The question now is whether they will soften that vision in pursuit of a majority of voters, or try to keep power as a minority party. 



  • Are the Republicans Repeating the Mistake of 1998?

    by Steven M. Gillon

    The Republican congressional leadership pushed ahead with the impeachment of Bill Clinton to appeal to their right-wing base. The strategy backfired: the party failed to make any midterm gains and Newt Gingrich was overthrown as Speaker. Will a similar dynamic play out over abortion in 2022?


  • The January 6 Committee and the Paranoid Style

    by Bruce W. Dearstyne

    Episodes consistent with the "paranoid style" recur with sufficient frequency in American history to make them a landmark of the culture. But it's less well understood how each individual episode has faded, insight we could use today. 



  • It's Not Hypocrisy When It's Fascism

    by William Horne

    The right is acting to advance a white Christian nationalist agenda through any means necessary, and has no regard for whether its actions match its stated principles if those actions advance their agenda. 



  • The Ongoing Legacy of Direct-Mail Grievance Politics

    by L. Benjamin Rolsky

    By privatizing political discourse, the pioneers of direct mail advertising could solicit funds at the same time as they stoked the fears of a targeted set of voters; this worked to bring the religious right into the heart of the Republican Party. 



  • Review: Two Books on the Recent History of Polarization

    by Paul Starr

    Historian Michael Kazin and journalist Dana Milbank approach the nation's dire politics from the perspective of the two respective parties, Kazin examining the long conflicts within the Democratic party to create a broad and stable populist coalition, and Milbank examining the GOP's increasingly nihilistic efforts to break it up.


  • Don't Call them Conservatives

    by Alan J. Singer

    As we confront what is happening in this country, we need to stop calling the MAGA movement conservative.


  • The Republicans' Holocaust Problem

    by Steve Hochstadt

    "New Republican laws and their emboldened approach to white supremacy will inevitably lead to an attack on any Holocaust teaching which goes beyond the discussion of prejudice to analyze the power of embedded racism and Christian white supremacy."


  • Is the Republican Party Willing to Purge its Extremists?

    by Jeff Kolnick

    Beginning in the 1920s, the Democratic Party began the long, difficult, and politically costly process of dissociation from white supremacy. Do today's Republicans who claim to reject extremism have the courage to do the same?