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slavery



  • What Is Owed: The Limits of Darity and Mullen's Case For Reparations

    by William P. Jones

    A historian argues that a recent and influential book calling for reparations could strengthen its case by considering the arguments made by historians about the connections of American slavery to other manifestations of racism. What's needed is to link reparations to a global overturning of racial inequality.


  • Teaching "All Men are Created Equal" (Part II)

    by Jeff Schneider

    In the second part of this essay, a longtime teacher of American history maintains that a close reading of the Declaration of Independence makes it possible to discuss revolution and racism in a thoughtful way without intimidating either white students or students of color.


  • Teaching "All Men are Created Equal" (Part I)

    by Jeff Schneider

    A longtime teacher of American history maintains that a close reading of the Declaration of Independence makes it possible to discuss revolution and racism in a thoughtful way without intimidating either white students or students of color.



  • Who Owns Uncle Ben?

    by Shane Mitchell

    "Why would anyone preserve a crop, no matter how flavorful and aromatic, with such a disturbing heritage?" Shane Mitchell examines why.



  • Overturning Five Myths of the Haitian Revolution

    by Julia Gaffield

    Many understandings of the Haitian Revolution, from its intellectual and political roots, to its military progress, to its political consequences, are at best half-truths. And it did not entail "white genocide." 



  • The United States Owes Haiti a Debt it Can't Repay

    by Annette Gordon-Reed

    The Haitian Revolution set in motion events that transformed France, North America, and the Caribbean, but conflicts were invariably resolved at the expense of independent Haiti. 



  • Her Family Owned Slaves. How Can She Make Amends?

    "For almost three years now, with the fervor of the newly converted, Ms. Marshall has been on a quest that from the outside may seem quixotic and even naïve. She is diving into her family’s past and trying to chip away at racism in the Deep South, where every white family with roots here benefited from slavery and almost every Black family had enslaved ancestors."



  • Looking for Nat Turner

    Christopher Tomlins' new book takes seriously the apocalyptic Christianity of Nat Turner, viewing it not as a metaphor for liberation but a key part of how Turner understood freedom. 



  • The Statue of Chief Justice Taney Never Belonged in the Capitol

    by Corey M. Brooks

    “If a man,” famed Massachusetts radical Charles Sumner asserted, “has done evil during his life he must not be complimented in marble.” Instead Sumner demanded “the name of Taney … be hooted down the page of history.”