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slavery



  • What Reparations Can Look Like

    by Martha S. Jones

    Are directed cash grant programs undertaken by churches, cities, or other civic organizations a viable way to deliver reparations as part of those institutions' efforts to acknowlege the harm of their past actions? 



  • Harvard Holds Remains of 7,000 Native and Enslaved Persons

    by Gillian Brockell

    A university task force convened last year to investigate the provenance of human remains in Harvard's museums and collections condemned the leak of the report while defending their committee's work toward returning remains to appropriate tribal authorities and memorializing the deceased. 



  • Considering the Full Life of Wilma Mankiller

    by Alaina E. Roberts

    Wilma Mankiller's career as an activist included a stint as the first female head of the Cherokee Nation, but she must also be remembered for the mass disenrollment of the descendants of Cherokee Freedmen from the tribe's rolls and their exclusion from a share of new income to the tribe. 



  • Judging Jefferson: Ideals or Actions?

    by Daniel N. Gullotta

    Thomas Kidd's intellectual and spiritual biography of Jefferson engages with the contradictions of the ideals he proclaimed and seeks to engage with the ambiguities of his subject in ways that defy both iconoclasm and hagiography. 



  • Inside the Reversal of the Montpelier Board

    The board approved the appointment of 11 members nominated by the Montpelier Descendants Committee, and the resignation of the board chair who led the resistance to the appointments is pending. 



  • Harvard President and Dean: Slavery Shaped the University

    by Lawrence S. Bacow and Tomiko Brown-Nagin

    Harvard's financial, infrastructural and intellectual legacies are unavoidably entangled with slavery. A new report is meant to signal the university's efforts at reckoning and reconciliation. 



  • Montpelier Descendants Call Foul on Board over Firings

    The firing of three senior staff members who support the involvement of the Montpelier Descendants Committee in the public presentation of James Madison's estate, and the slavery practiced there, has raised questions about whether Montpelier is committed to historical honesty.