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historiography



  • The Wages of Whiteness (Review Essay)

    Hari Kunzru's review essay examines the current vogue for white antiracism (and antiracist training) through the history of whiteness as a political and academic concept, concluding that many  of the most popular books and multicultural pieties strip the idea of its structural elements and reduce it to a question of personal purification. 



  • The Interdisciplinarity and Influence of Alan Trachtenberg

    by Jennifer Giuliano and Lauren Tilton

    "The need to interrogate, understand, and even disrupt how we see images is a part of Trachtenberg’s enduring legacy that becomes more important as researchers are distanced from physical archives." The work of Alan Trachtenberg in developing historical methodologies for understanding images is crucial for historians' ability to speak to current affairs.



  • Rethinking Who and What Get Memorialized

    The notion that history can be rewritten is a powerful one. It starts by taking the pen from the authors we’ve always had — and giving it to someone else.



  • The Black Freedom Struggle of the North (Review)

    "'The Strange Careers of the Jim Crow North' is a major milestone in the growing historical literature on racial discrimination and the civil rights struggle outside the South," writes Joshua Clark Davis.



  • Os Guinness, Eric Metaxas, and Their Dangerous Myths of American History

    by Abram Van Engen

    "Only when we begin to see the multiplicity and complexity of history can we begin to understand how God moves in it and through it, and how we, in the present, can and should respond—righting wrongs and attempting to shine a light in dark places," writes Abram Van Engen.



  • The New York Times Covers the “Clash of the Historians” at SHEAR

    by John Fea

    An early Americanist reflects on the controversy stirred up by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic's virtual plenary and its coverage in the mainstream media, and asks whether these are the battles historians should be fighting right now. 



  • Continuing to Reshape Women’s History: The Ongoing Story of Nontraditional Women Historians

    by Julie Gallagher and Barbara Winslow

    The editors of a collection of essays by non-traditional women historians celebrate the impact of the Catherine Prelinger Award (of the Coordinating Council for Women in History), which aided the scholarship published in their book and is supporting a new generation of women historians expanding the scope of the field to address race, disability, indigeneity, and mass incarceration (among other issues).



  • Baseball History and Rural America

    The study of how baseball evolved, historain David Vaught writes, remains a test of how history is written--from concern with origin moments or attention to ongoing processes of change and development.



  • The Pandemic Has Led to an Outbreak of Terrible Historical Analogies

    The pandemic has given Americans lots to think about, not the least of which are the awful historical analogies and references used to make its worst actors seem valorous. Here are some of the most egregious examples, why they’re absurd, and why they should be taken seriously.



  • What Was Saved

    Sarah Broom's memoir "The Yellow House" reconstructs not only her family’s history in New Orleans but also that larger arc of the black experience in the United States.



  • Neglected Gems of Urban History

    by Richard Harris

    For two generations, Lampard told urban historians that cities mattered especially, but not only, in economic terms.