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colonialism



  • The Bitter, Contested History of Globalization

    Tara Zahra's book places the conflicts of the middle of the 20th century in the context of profound global debates about how interconnected the world should be, and on whose terms. 



  • Parthenon Marbles' Fate Subject to Secret Talks

    The British Museum and Greek government officials have acknowledged secret talks over the last two years about the repatriation of marbles taken by Lord Elgin from the Parthenon in the early 1800s. The resolution is not yet known. 



  • Was Emancipation Intended to Perpetuate Slavery by Other Means?

    by Sean Wilentz

    Protests movements have latched on to a misguided interpretation of the Thirteenth Amendment that argues it allowed and even encouraged the system of mass incarceration as an extension of slavery. A new global history extends that critique to the age of emancipation in general.


  • Does Novelist Robert Keable Deserve a Reappraisal?

    by Simon Keable-Elliott

    Briefly celebrated in the 1920s, then consigned to posthumous obscurity, the missionary and novelist, whose experiences encompassed the collision of colonialism, war and racism in the British empire, is overdue for rediscovery. 



  • The Specter of Foreign Forces in Haiti

    by Ambroise Jean-Léon (trans. by Awori Othieno)

    The situation in Haiti now echoes a long history of coercion by foreign governments who have leveraged the threat of invasion to steer domestic politics. 



  • France's Return of 24 Skulls to Algeria Wasn't What it Seemed

    The French and Algerian governments have both played up the gesture of reconciliation, without acknowledging that the provenance of the remains is dubious (only 6 are documented to be the skulls of Algerian resistance fighters) and they remain French property. 



  • The Forgotten Violence of the US-Philippines Relationship

    by Adrian De Leon

    By declaring a relationship of "friends, partners, and allies" between the United States and the Philippines, and embracing the regime of Ferdinand Marcos, Jr., the United States concealed its violent conquest of the islands and its ongoing support for authoritarian rule there. 



  • Mourn the Queen, Not the Empire

    by Maya Jasanoff

    As the head of the postwar British Commonwealth, the Queen symbolized the effort to put the brakes on the global wave of decolonization, including deadly and secret campaigns of state violence in Northern Ireland, Kenya, and elsewhere.



  • Queen Not Innocent of Empire's Sins

    by Howard W. French

    "I bear no ill will toward her following her death. Her empire—and empires more generally—though is another matter."