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international relations



  • Can Cold War History Help Stop a Disastrous US-China Conflict?

    by Li Chen and Odd Arne Westad

    The emerging superpower rivalry between the US and China is not exactly like the Cold War, and simplistic historical analogies are a poor strategic guide. But Cold War history does offer examples of potential pitfalls. 


  • Imagine a World Remade by US-China Cooperation

    by Lawrence Wittner

    The world has everything to gain from remaking the US-China relationship around cooperative approaches to global problems. Will Xi and Biden follow the example of Reagan and Gorbachev? 



  • The Winner in Afghanistan? China

    by Alfred McCoy

    While the similarities between the American exits from Vietnam and Afghanistan are superficially obvious, the differences are more significant, and signal a steep decline in America's ability to influence world affairs. 



  • On the Eve of Destruction: Breaking the Double-Bind of the Nuclear Arms Race

    by Richard Rhodes

    Politicians and defense contractors who wanted American nuclear supremacy won out over scientists seeking international effort to contain the extinction-level threat posed by thermonuclear weapons, even to the point of denying the planet-destroying power of the H-bomb. 



  • Is the US Ready to Stop Being the World's Policeman?

    Historians Daniel Immerwahr and Stephen Wertheim are among the experts quoted on the rise of the idea of American interventionism and its reconsideration after twenty years of the War on Terror. 



  • On the Brink in 2026 U.S.-China Near-War Status Report

    by Michael Klare

    The Pentagon's call for more funding to strengthen deterrence against China portends an escalation of tensions that could, in five years, plausibly put the two superpowers on the verge of war.



  • The Ethics of Coalition-Building

    by Samuel Moyn

    Can progressives justify alliances with the America-First right to push Biden to stop America's "forever wars"? 



  • Beyond the Nation-State

    by Claire Vergerio

    Much of what has been told about the rise of the nation-state from the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 is wrong. Reevaluating the history of the nation-state is essential for conceptualizing solutions to local and global problems that defy the logic of the nation-state.



  • Does Biden Really Want to End the Forever Wars?

    by Jack Goldsmith and Samuel Moyn

    Recent presidents, including Joe Biden, have relied on an expansive view of presidential powers under Article II of the Constitution to conduct military action outside of the framework of declared war.