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international relations



  • Biden's Taiwan Rhetoric Risks Antagonizing China For No Gain

    by Stephen Wertheim

    The United States' "One China" policy is ambivalent, awkward and dissatisfying. But it's served to prevent a destructive war for decades. Biden's recent comments threaten to destabilize the arrangement. 



  • How Ideology Shapes America's View on the World

    Christopher McKnight Nichols, Raymond Haberski, Jr., and Emily Conroy-Krutz join host Jeremi Suri of the University of Texas, Austin to discuss what ideology is, and explore the ways in which it has shaped, and continues to shape, America’s role in the world.



  • Will Putin's Invasion Derail the Quincy Institute?

    The think tank was founded to counter what its leaders saw as a bipartisan alliance of neoconservatives and liberal interventionists that pushed the United States toward military intervention as the solution to foreign policy problems. How will the Ukraine war affect its credibility in policy circles? 


  • No Time Like the Present for a Visit to Kyiv

    by Andreas Umland

    As the situation in Western and Central Ukraine has for now stabilized, a trip to Kyiv can provide those interested in international affairs with a unique opportunity to observe world history in the making.


  • Why Should War Criminals Operate with Impunity?

    by Lawrence Wittner

    When major military powers like Russia, China and the United States withhold participation in the International Criminal Court, it allows war criminals to do as they please. Leading a more stable international order means joining fully with the ICC. 


  • Is Biden Prepared to Adopt a Truly Progressive Foreign Policy?

    by Leon Fink

    Protecting the so-called Liberal World Order these days puts great emphasis on preserving “order” but very little on what “liberal” can or should mean. The administration risks fumbling an opportunity to connect with new foreign leadership on labor, environment, immigration, and other issues beyond security and the drug war.


  • The Rising "Pink Tide" in Latin America Shows the Need for US Policy to Adapt

    by Aileen T. Teague

    Colombia has historically been a conservative firewall in Latin America, anchoring American policy on the hemispheric drug war and development policy. The election of that nation's first leftist leader, along with the rise of Chinese influence, signals the need for American policy to change. 



  • Is the Ukraine War the Start of a New Period of History?

    by David A. Bell

    The idea that the Russian invasion will be seen as a turning point by future scholars is tempting given the immediate seriousness of events. But two years ago, people were saying the same thing about the COVID pandemic. 



  • Is International Cooperation Possible?

    by Tiziana Stella and Campbell Craig

    The United Nations system, based on the sovereignty of nations, is increasingly inadequate to the global problems facing humanity. There are other international traditions that can guide a better world order.