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Palestine



  • How Christian Archaeologists Fed Today's Strife in Jerusalem

    by Andrew Lawler

    The incursions of 19th century Christian archaeologists onto Jerusalem's historic acropolis created a sense of seige on the part of Palestinian Muslims, which is echoed today in ongoing conflict over the city's religious sites. 



  • Solomon's Peace Accord

    by David Marks

    Can Israelis and Palestinians imagine and implement a Solomonic peace? 



  • The Unbearable Easiness of Killing

    by Arie M. Dubnov

    "As a colleague justly commented, it is only helpful to call a situation ‘complicated’ if one is committed to unfolding the package, willing to examine its contents and prepared to be surprised by what one finds hidden inside."



  • Because of Palestine

    by N.A. Mansour

    "It is because I am Palestinian that I can tell you that objectivity—in history-writing, in the archives, in museums—does not exist."


  • Jerusalem: A Divided and Invented City

    by James A.S. Sunderland

    Both Hamas and the Israeli right base their claims to Jerusalem on understandings of the city as shaped by the orientalist and segregationist values of British governors during the Mandate period, and not on the city's longer heterogenous and multicultural history. Peace activists look to that history as an example of coexistence. 



  • In Israel, the Violent Legacy of 1948

    by Benny Morris

    "The chaos in the towns of Lydda, Ramle, Haifa, Umm al-Fahm and Acre is a dim echo of the civil war between Palestine’s Jewish and Arab communities that engulfed the country during the first months of the 1948 war."



  • This is a War Israel Can’t Win

    by Max Boot

    Post columnist Max Boot argues that the current cycle of attacks and reprisals are symbolic political gestures, and that Israel should declare that it's made its point and resume the work of political normalization with its Arab neighbors and political concessions with the Palestinian Authority that marginalize Hamas.



  • In Israel’s Rising Violence, Ripples From 1948

    The eruption of communal violence between Jews and Arabs in Israeli towns with mixed populations is a legacy of the events of 1948, when, in the context of war, many towns' Arab populations were purged (historians debate the degree to which this was planned, or part of Israeli state policy). 



  • Why the Al-Aqsa Mosque has Often been a Site of Conflict

    by Ken Chitwood

    "Controlled access to the site reminds Palestinians of their relative powerlessness in their ongoing land disputes with Israeli authorities. At the same time, attacks at Al-Aqsa resonate with Muslims across the world who react with horror to what they see as the desecration of one of their most sacred sites."



  • Teshuvah: A Jewish Case for Palestinian Refugee Return

    by Peter Beinart

    Peter Beinart argues that the history of the Jewish people and the events of 1948 compel Israeli political leaders and American and world Jewish organizations to recognize a right of return for displaced Palestinians as part of a resolution to the current crisis in East Jerusalem. 



  • The World of Edward Said

    by Esmat Elhalaby

    Previous biographies of the Arab scholar and Palestinian advocate Edward Said have either reduced him to his more provocative political statements or treated those politics as a pose. A new biography by Timothy Brennan examines the connections between intellectual life and a global community of activists. 



  • Israeli Rights Group: Nation Isn't a Democracy but an "Apartheid Regime"

    B'Tselem declared that "the traditional view of Israel as a democracy operating side-by-side with a temporary Israeli occupation in the territories 'imposed on some five million Palestinian subjects ... has grown divorced from reality'." The Israeli embassy in London dismissed the finding.