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archaeology


  • A Hundred Years On, Tutankhamun's Alleged Curse Still Captivates

    by Gill Paul

    The fevered belief that visitors to Tutankhamun's tomb (and their families) were cursed became a media phenomenon in 1922, but popular culture from the Bible to Victorian serial stories and stage plays had already linked mummies and the supernatural. Today, curses persist alongside conspiracy theories to help ease the randomness of tragedy.



  • What Will Nobel Recognition Mean for Ancient Human DNA Studies?

    by Mary Prendergast

    An archaeologist sees the recogntion of paleogenomics as a vital tool to reinvigorate the field's access to knowledge about early humans, but warns that the science needs to be accompanied by ethical self-reflection to respect the remains of indigenous people and avoid giving credence to pseudoscientific racism. 



  • What Must Be Done with Native Remains in Texas's Big Bend Region?

    Byron Schroeder ran into difficulty tracking down the story of a commerical artifact digging operation on private land. Past participants were reticent because, in addition to artifacts, some had removed human remains. The story highlights the divides between academic and amateur archaeologists and the ethics of digs.



  • The Paradox of Sourness

    Of all the major taste categories, the relationship between human thriving and sensing sourness is the least understood. 



  • When a Bible Isn't a Bible

    by Kathleen E. Kennedy

    The British press has bungled its accounting of the discovery of a gold bead in the form of an open book. If it's not a Bible, what is it? 



  • How Christian Archaeologists Fed Today's Strife in Jerusalem

    by Andrew Lawler

    The incursions of 19th century Christian archaeologists onto Jerusalem's historic acropolis created a sense of seige on the part of Palestinian Muslims, which is echoed today in ongoing conflict over the city's religious sites. 



  • David Graeber and David Wengrow Have Given Human History a Rewrite

    by William Deresiewicz

    A new effort at a synthesis of the sweep of human history upends what recent popularizers have presented as a progressive path from hunter-gatherer society to corporate capitalism by emphasizing choice, contingency, and the possibility of doing things differently.