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war crimes



  • Of Nazis, Crimes and Punishment

    Understanding the neurological changes brought on by adolescence and aging make it complicated to determine what justice is in the case of a Nazi camp guard deported from the United States to Germany in February. 



  • Can Historians Be Traumatized by History? (Content Warning)

    by James Robins

    "If the historian—the very person supposed to process the past on behalf of everyone else—struggles with trauma, then it is little surprise that societies as a whole struggle to face the violence of how they were formed and how they prevailed."


  • Were Trump's Pardons Even Legal?

    by James D. Zirin

    Almost all the pundits, constitutional lawyers, and members of the professoriate are laying down their arms, largely conceding that the President has broad powers to pardon anyone in the world, with the possible exception of himself. But are they giving too much away?"



  • German Historians on Frontlines of Politics

    German historians have faced lawsuits for writing about World War II-era crimes by the Wehrmacht, part of a growing culture war in which right-wing Germans seek to deny or diminish the Holocaust and Nazi war crimes.



  • Henry Wirz and Andersonville Prison

    Henry Wirz, commander of the infamous Confederate prison at Andersonville, Georgia, was hanged on November 10, 1865, in Washington, D.C., the only Confederate officer executed as a war criminal.



  • Opinion: 75 Years On, Remember Hiroshima And Nagasaki. But Remember Toyama Too

    by Cary Karacas and David Fedman

    AAF officials commonly used sanitizing language to mask the fact that they were targeting entire cities for destruction. Press releases described attacks not on cities, but on "industrial urban areas." Tactical reports set their sights not on densely populated neighborhoods, but on "worker housing."


  • The Whistleblowers of the My Lai Massacre

    by Howard Jones

    Evidence—and history—ultimately showed that an Army cover-up took place after the massacre. We know about it because of a single whistleblower and his two crewmates.



  • Of Crimes and Pardons

    by Rebecca Gordon

    The United States was not always so reluctant to put national leaders on trial for their war crimes.