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public history



  • Making Public History More Accessible During Times of Uncertainty

    by Nick Sacco

    The curtailment of in-person programming at national parks due to COVID is a great occasion for the parks system to undertake deep consideration of the issue of accessibility in its programs and facilities. 



  • What Was the Dixie Highway, Anyway?

    Historian Tammy Ingram discusses the Dixie Highway, about which she wrote the book, as a rare project of early 20th-century highway building and tourism development that was completed. 


  • The Devil and Mary Lease

    by Alan J. Singer

    Populist and feminist agitator Mary Lease advised farmers to "raise less corn and more hell." Her brand of hell-raising, however, included a strong current of antisemitism that needs to be widely known.



  • The Thanksgiving Myth Gets a Deeper Look This Year

    “There was an event that happened in 1621,” Wampanoag historian Linda Coombs said. “But the whole story about what occurred on that first Thanksgiving was a myth created to make white people feel comfortable.” Native activists hope to disrupt the stories of Thanksgiving by questioning public history and by recovering indigenous food practices.



  • Dozens Of Academics Oppose New Controversial Yad Vashem Chair

    Holocaust historian Deborah Lipstadt is among the academics criticizing the appointment of a right-wing politician to head the Israeli Holocaust memorial and educational center, arguing that his remarks toward Palestinians and Arab Israelis are disqualifying. 


  • Reckoning with Marcus Whitman and the Memorialization of Conquest

    by Cassandra Tate

    The same period that saw the public affirmation of the Confederate Lost Cause myth saw a proliferation of monuments that portrayed the conquest of the indigenous people of the west as virtuous pioneering. The case of Marcus Whitman shows a national reckoning is in order.



  • Alexander Hamilton, Enslaver? New Research Says Yes

    A paper by a researcher at the Schuyler Mansion finds overlooked evidence in letters and Hamilton’s own account books indicating that he bought, sold and personally owned slaves.