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public history



  • The Women Behind the Million Man March

    by Natalie Hopkinson

    Community archives such as the District of Columbia’s are critical interventions into the omissions of history. This one, like others, makes clear that behind every great feat in the public record lies an untold story of the unsung foot soldiers, architects, analysts and fixers — and these are often women.



  • #WEWANTMOREHISTORY

    by Greg Downs, Hilary N. Green, Scott Hancock, and Kate Masur

    At historic sites across the United States on September 26, dozens of participating historians presented evidence to disrupt, correct, or fill out the oversimplified and problematic messages too often communicated by the nation’s memorial landscape.



  • The Desert Keeps Receipts

    by B. Erin Cole

    A meditation on the preservation of the Nevada Test Site in graphic form.



  • Amid the Monument Wars, a Rally for ‘More History’

    “Historians have different views on taking down statues,” said Gregory Downs, a professor at the University of California, Davis, and one of the organizers. “But that debate doesn’t really capture what historians do, which is to bring more history.”



  • Civil War Day of Action: Leading a Reading Group

    by Julie A. Mujic

    Leading a reading group is a great, and socially-distanced, way to take part in the Day of Action for Civil War history. Here are some tips. 



  • My Local Confederate Monument

    by Casey Cep

    The author examines the history and politics of the last remaining Confederate monument on public lands, other than battlefields and cemeteries, in the state of Maryland.