;

Russia


  • Who and What to Believe about Ukraine?

    by Walter G. Moss

    Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the ongoing war test our ability as citizens to be aware of our biases in search of information and understanding. 


  • Why Should War Criminals Operate with Impunity?

    by Lawrence Wittner

    When major military powers like Russia, China and the United States withhold participation in the International Criminal Court, it allows war criminals to do as they please. Leading a more stable international order means joining fully with the ICC. 



  • Putin's Rule is Weakening. Then What?

    by Timothy Snyder

    A shift in rhetoric from prominent Russian politicians has revealed fissures in their relationships to Putin, suggesting that they are positioning themselves to benefit from a difficult war in Ukraine and a possible political upheaval.



  • Tim Snyder: Russians Openly Contemplating Post-Putin Era

    Domestic politicians warning of the danger Russia faces from the stalled Ukraine war are partly trying to rally nationalistic fervor and partly positioning themselves for a possible struggle for power in the event that Putin loses control. 


  • The Wagner Group is Just the Latest Example of Privatized War

    by Lawrence Wittner

    Hiring soldiers of fortune to wage war has long been profitable to mercenaries and politically advantageous to rulers. Its modern resurgence with the American Blackwater organization and the Russian Wagner Group show the need for stronger cooperative security to prevent human rights abuse.



  • Is the Ukraine War the Start of a New Period of History?

    by David A. Bell

    The idea that the Russian invasion will be seen as a turning point by future scholars is tempting given the immediate seriousness of events. But two years ago, people were saying the same thing about the COVID pandemic. 



  • The War Won't End Until Putin Loses

    by Anne Applebaum

    It's premature and wishful thinking to believe that Putin will consider any of the "off ramps" offered as solutions to the war. 


  • The Dangerous Trend of Imperial Nostalgia – It's not Just Russia

    by Lawrence Wittner

    The embrace of the belief that nations are entitled to reclaim their past dominance underlies Russia's invasion of Ukraine but also is influencing the politics of Britain, France, China, and the United States. A renewed commitment to international cooperation is needed to thwart this dangerous turn. 


  • Democracy's Enemies are Abroad, but Also at Home

    by Jim Sleeper

    If neoconservative warnings of a coming global struggle between Russia and "the West" are right, the west must consider what changes it is willing to make to allow for a victory without planetery catastrophe. 



  • Ukraine's Nuclear Flash Point

    by Michael Klare

    With Russia's invasion of Ukraine backstopped by a nuclear arsenal, the days when nuclear war was unthinkable have clearly passed.