;

womens history



  • How Domestic Labor Became Infrastructure

    Writer Moira Donegan argues that including funding for care workers in the infrastructure bill is eminently reasonable; feminist intellectuals for decades have argued that this work is essential to the broader economy, so funding it and supporting it makes sense economically and to recognize the labor of women. 



  • Registering Women for the Draft Wouldn’t be a Big Departure from the Past

    by Kara Dixon Vuic

    An odd alliance of the ACLU and the antifeminist National Coalition for Men is petitioning the Supreme Court to overturn a ruling exempting women from registering with the Selective Service and potentially being drafted into the military. Many voices have long advocated this change. 



  • Stacey Abrams’s Fight against Voter Suppression Dates Back to the Revolution

    by Karen Cook Bell

    "The roots of Black women’s activism can be traced back to the Revolutionary Era, when thousands of Black women protested with their feet and ran away from their enslavers." This act would shape the demands of radical Black politics in the ensuing decades.



  • Baylor Professor Argues 'Biblical Womanhood' More Cultural Than Biblical

    Beth Allison Barr argues that contemporary Christianity's doctrines on gender roles in the family are influenced more by the historical claim to power by men than by clear scriptural dictate, and that there are numerous historical examples of differently-ordered gender roles in Christianity. 



  • Women’s College Sports Was Growing. Then the NCAA Took Over

    The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women was pushed aside by the NCAA as universities dedicated more resources to women's sports to comply with Title IX. Critics say that the NCAA has not followed through on the need for equity while squeezing out women coaches and athletic administrators.



  • I Don’t Want My Role Models Erased

    by Elizabeth Becker

    The work of women journalists covering the war in Vietnam has been obscured in remembrance of the war and its place in American history and culture. The author seeks to recover the stories of Frances FitzGerald, Kate Webb and Catherine Leroy.



  • Pay Attention When They Tell You To Forget

    by Christina Proenza-Coles

    Writing across genres and time periods, the books of poet and memorist (and former Poet Laureate of the United States) Natasha Trethewey, historian Martha S. Jones, and poet-playwright-essayist Claudia Rankine constitute a conversation about Black women's work to remember history that is subjected to public suppression. 


  • Racism, Sexism Must be Considered in Atlanta Case, Experts Say

    Historian Ellen Wu explains that the particular racial and sexual stereotyping of Asian American women derives from the history of immigration, moral panics over prostitution, and the involvement of the United States military in a series of wars against Asian people. 



  • The Triangle Fire and the Fight for $15

    by Christopher C. Gorham

    The Triangle Shirtwaist fire inspired workplace safety regulation and advanced the cause of organized labor. It's time to remember the victims with a commitment to a federal living wage law.



  • Dorothy Pitman Hughes’s Activism Offers a Solution for the Coronavirus Gender Gap

    by Laura L. Lovett

    Dorothy Pitman Hughes' experience running a community childcare center highlighted not just the needs of working women, but the ways that childcare challenges were connected to all the big issues of the society. If we want a more just society today, Hughes' example and the COVID crisis show us where to look. 


  • The Long History of Women Warriors

    by Fred Zilian

    Archaeological discoveries dating to the 5th century BCE show that the Amazons of Greek lore were based on the nomadic Scythians of Eurasia, part of a body of evidence that confounds the idea that rigidly demarcated gender roles are universal or inevitable.