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Georgia



  • How Alvin the Beagle Helped Usher in a Democratic Senate

    On the surface, Raphael Warnock's campaign ads featured a cute beagle. But they reflected a calculated – and successful – effort to counter racial dynamics in Georgia politics to bring about a historic victory. 



  • Georgia’s New Senators will Write the Next Chapter in Black-Jewish Relations

    by Jeff Melnick

    The history of the Leo Frank trial and lynching shows that, while both groups have faced prejudice and discrimination, "the glory of Black-Jewish relations has always been more aspirational than achieved." Georgia's two new senators have a chance to advance a coalition for progress and equity.



  • Will the Democrats Win in Georgia?

    by Jason Sokol

    Eugene Talmadge served three terms as Georgia's governor through a combination of racism, attacks on government, and a state electoral system that grossly overrepresented rural whites. The January 5 runoff will test whether at least one of those dynamics has changed in Georgia politics. 



  • Even if Georgia Turns Blue, North Carolina may not Follow

    by Michael Bitzer and Virginia Summey

    North Carolina's politics have long been characterized by a competition between fairly evenly balanced forces of conservatism and moderation. Democrats who hope to permanently tip the state in their favor are likely to be disappointed. 



  • How Atlanta’s Politics Overtook the Suburbs, Too

    Kevin Kruse is among the scholars of Atlanta who offer insight on how the growth of the metro area has overcome the division between the city and its suburbs and turned Georgia purple.



  • There’s A Long History Behind Stacey Abrams

    Historian Martha S. Jones places Stacey Abrams's political leadership in Georgia in the historical context of Black women's political organizing and activism. 



  • Georgia’s Political Shift – a Tale of Urban and Suburban Change

    by Jan Nijman

    If Georgia is demographically and politically becoming unlike neighboring Republican strongholds like Alabama and Tennessee, it has, in some respects, moved in a similar direction as Arizona, where the two major metropolitan regions of Phoenix and Tucson make up over 80% of the state’s population, and where Democrats have improved their standing in recent years.