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  • Originally published 07/16/2013

    AHA announces grant winners for 2013

    Courtesy Julie-Irene Nkodo, project assistant at the AHA.Bernadotte Schmitt Grant: to support research in the history of Europe, Asia, and AfricaJeffrey Ahlman, Smith College “Living with Nkrumahism: Nation, State, and Pan-Africanism in Ghana.”Laura Beers, American University “Red Ellen: Socialist, Feminist, Internationalist.”Alexander Bevilacqua, Princeton University “Islamic Culture in the European Enlightenment.”Jessica Clark, McGill University “Imperial Beauty: The Global Trade in Appearance, 1830-1930.”Surekha Davies, Western Connecticut State University “Mapping the Peoples of the New World: Ethnography, Imagery and Knowledge in Early Modern Europe.”Erin Hochman, Southern Methodist University “Anschluss before Hitler: The Politics of Transborder Nationalism in Germany and Austria, 1918-1938.”

  • Originally published 05/06/2013

    AHA supports visas for Cuban scholars to attend LASA conference

    The following letter was submitted to the United States Secretary of State, John Kerry, in support to facilitate visas for Cuban scholars to attend the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) conference. Dear Mr. Secretary:I write on behalf of the American Historical Association (AHA) to request your support to facilitate visas for Cuban scholars who have been invited to participate in the XXXI International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association to be held May 29 to June 1, 2013 in Washington, D.C.

  • Originally published 05/01/2013

    AHA seeking new director of scholarly communication and digital initiatives

    The American Historical Association is seeking a Director of Scholarly Communication and Digital Initiatives. The Director of Scholarly Communication and Digital Initiatives will oversee the AHA’s communications with members and other constituencies. This includes print and digital publishing, web design, information management, and membership – all part of a strategy to enable the American Historical Association’s programs and activities to take maximum advantage of the new digital environments in which historians work. The AHA seeks a scholar with the skills and vision to help lead the development of the AHA as the nation’s most important hub for the work of professional historians in the 21st century....

  • Originally published 04/17/2013

    Number of history majors decline; lowest level in ten years

    Robert Townsend is the AHA’s deputy director, and the author of History’s Babel: Scholarship, Professionalization, and the Historical Enterprise, 1880–1940 (Univ. of Chicago Press).During the 2010–11 academic year, the number of undergraduate students earning degrees in history dropped—albeit by a small percentage—for the first time in a decade, even as the number of students earning degrees in all fields continued to rise. As a result, the history discipline's share of degrees earned in 2011 declined to the lowest level in 10 years (fig. 1).According to new information from the Department of Education, history programs conferred 35,059 bachelor's degrees in the discipline, and another 3,588 students earned degrees with history as their second major. Together, 0.6 percent fewer students earned history degrees this year compared to last.1

  • Originally published 03/26/2013

    American Historical Association announces nominees for 2013-2014

    The Nominating Committee for 2013–14, chaired by Raúl A. Ramos (University of Houston), met in Washington, D.C. on February 9–10 and offers the following candidates for offices of the Association that are to be filled in the election this year:President (1-year term) Jan E. Goldstein, University of Chicago (modern European intellectual and cultural history in social and political context, modern France, history of the human sciences)President-elect (1-year term)David Levering Lewis, New York University (political biography, literature of racism, Europe in Africa, Islam in Europe)Vicki L. Ruiz, University of California, Irvine (Chicano/Latino, U.S. women’s, immigration, labor)Vice-President, Professional Division (3-year term)

  • Originally published 03/26/2013

    Nominations Invited for the American Historical Association’s Equity Awards

    The American Historical Association seeks nominations for its Equity Awards, which recognize individuals and institutions that have demonstrated an exceptional record in recruiting and retaining students and new faculty from racial and ethnic groups underrepresented within the historical profession. Nominations are due by May 15....

  • Originally published 03/05/2013

    AHA addresses historical issues in Supreme Court DOMA case

    Kenneth Pomeranz and James Grossman are the president and executive director of the American Historical Association, respectively.The American Historical Association has joined a group of individual distinguished historians in signing an amicus brief in US v. Windsor, a case before the Supreme Court contesting the validity of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). As is so often the case in legal contexts, the details can get lost in the swirl of broader issues and we want to clarify some important aspects of the AHA’s decision.The brief that the AHA has joined addresses strictly historical issues: in this case, how marriage has historically been regulated in the United States, and the purposes for which marriage has been thought to exist.  In both matters, it replies, in part, to a brief by the Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group of the House of Representatives (“BLAG”).

  • Originally published 02/05/2013

    Emancipation Proclamation Sesquicentennial Events Offer a Window into Current Historiography Debate

    Vanessa Varin is Assistant Editor, Web and Social Media at the American Historical Association.January 1, 2013, marked the sesquicentennial of the Emancipation Proclamation. Although the general historical consensus is that slavery was at the root of the conflict, questions about the role of the proclamation in defining the Civil War and 19th century race relations continue to dominate the field. In the past few weeks, Washington, D.C., has hosted two events on the topic: A panel discussion at the National Archives (NARA), chaired by Annette Gordon-Reed and featuring James Oakes, Eric Foner, James McPherson, and Ed Ayers, and a more intimate lecture led by Foner at the Wilson Center and sponsored by the National History Center. The well-attended events were an opportunity to promote this history to the public, and a window into the current state of the debate over how we should understand the document and its centrality to the Civil War.  

  • Originally published 01/28/2013

    Job Searches at the AHA Annual Meeting

    Search committees conducted interviews for over 154 positions at the 2013 AHA annual meeting, almost matching last year’s total of 160. The number of searches slipped a bit, which is typical in smaller meeting cities.For the first time in recent memory, jobs with a European specialization outnumbered those for the United States, 25 to 24 percent. The next highest was Asia, followed by Latin America, and then thematic. These searches, which did not require a specific geographical area, were mostly for public and digital historians. Five percent or less of the searches asked for either African, Middle East, or world history specializations....

  • Originally published 01/28/2013

    Mellon Grant Meetings in New Orleans

    In December, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded the American Historical Association and the Modern Language Association grants for broadening the career horizons of humanities PhDs. At its 2013 annual meeting in New Orleans, the AHA hosted the project’s initial conversations. Dozens of directors of graduate studies, university administrators, and contingent faculty members met with AHA past president Anthony Grafton, senior project advisor Robert Weisbuch, and project director Julia Brookins. They discussed the implications of what we already know—and do not know—about the careers of history doctorates who are not postsecondary teachers.Administrators from a range of universities focused on disciplinary definitions of “placement.” They described how placement statistics currently encourage history departments to discount or ignore PhD alumni embarking on careers outside the professoriate, however illustrious their paths might be. They shared examples of alternative approaches in disciplines like chemistry and engineering. Participants suggested that the AHA could lead the redefinition of a successful job placement for newly minted PhDs. They also discussed ways that they and their colleagues in administration could help to make placement incentives reflect more fully what historians value about their training and abilities....

  • Originally published 01/22/2013

    Exclusive content from AHA online earlier than expected

    Allen Mikaelian is editor of the AHA magazine Perspectives on History.Responding to the high level of interest in the article on History Harvests in Perspectives on History, we are opening it to all readers ahead of schedule.William G. Thomas, Patrick D. Jones (both of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln), and Andrew Witmer (James Madison University) describe the History Harvest as “exciting and rewarding work at the intersection of digital history and experiential learning.” History Harvests are “community events in which students scan or photograph items of historical interest, brought in by local institutions and residents, for online display.”“Every family and community has a history,” the authors explain, “a connection to the larger story of the American experience, and in the History Harvest we explore those connections, talk about them, and document their meaning in partnership with the participants. Our aim is to make invisible archives and stories more visible, bringing them into the public realm to be shared, heard, and seen.”

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