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AHA



  • 2020 AHA RESEARCH GRANT WINNERS

    The American Historical Association recently announced 37 winners of its annual research grants. 



  • The AHA, Historians, and COVID-19

    by James Grossman

    AHA President James Grossman says that as historians, we work hard to understand people—the people we study and the people we teach, in the classroom and beyond. This perspective will inform the AHA's efforts to help historians affected by this emergency.



  • Responsibility and Civility: The Unwritten Essentials

    by Mary Lindemann

    Critical to the prospering of any academic group are the unwritten expectations that underlie and ground its workings. When they’re observed, organizations prosper; when they’re disregarded, things go terribly wrong.



  • Lawsuit: Ice Must Not Destroy Detainee Records

    NARA approved ICE’s request to begin destroying the records in December 2019, despite ongoing concerns and reports of widespread mistreatment of individuals detained in ICE custody.



  • AHA Publishes 2020 Jobs Report

    by Dylan Ruediger

    New History PhDs Awarded Continue to Decline as Academic Job Market Remains Flat



  • On the Recent Executive Order on"Free Inquiry" in Higher Education

    by James Grossman and Edward Liebow

    President Donald Trump’s executive order of March 21 on “free inquiry, transparency, and accountability in colleges and universities” is a textbook example of a classic negotiating ploy—misdirection. 



  • Attack on the AHA Couldn’t Be More Wrong

    by Joy Connolly

    "As interim President of a large public graduate school, I believe passionately in providing education that empowers students to make the most of their lives, whether or not they pursue careers in the academy."



  • A Moral Stain on the Profession

    by Daniel Bessner and Michael Brenes

    As the humanities collapse, it’s time to name and shame the culprits.



  • The Fate of the "AHA Interview"

    by John R. McNeill

    Even if in-person interviews yield more useful information than videoconferencing, the economic argument for abandoning the tradition is hard to resist.