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Harvard



  • Harvard President and Dean: Slavery Shaped the University

    by Lawrence S. Bacow and Tomiko Brown-Nagin

    Harvard's financial, infrastructural and intellectual legacies are unavoidably entangled with slavery. A new report is meant to signal the university's efforts at reckoning and reconciliation. 



  • A Pledge to Recuse by KBJ Likely Means the End of Affirmative Action

    by Keisha N. Blain

    With a challenge to Harvard's affirmative action looming, Judge Jackson's pledge to recuse herself means that the Supreme Court is more likely to rule that affirmative action in private university admissions is unconstitutional, with the likely consequence of increasing racial inequality. 



  • The Revolt of the Super Employees

    by Erik Baker

    The business managerial ethos established in the 1980s destroyed the idea of solidarity and replaced it with a fantasy version of meritocracy. Now, upper-middle management is having the rug pulled out from under it, and they're mad. Are they mad enough to recognize the faults of the system? 



  • When Professors Close Ranks

    by Claire Bond Potter

    If administrations can't be counted on to support student victims of sexual harassment, faculty need to be prepared to defend students and help them defend themselves by whatever means necessary. 


  • Historians on the Harvard Sexual Harassment Scandal

    Two competing open letters pitted Harvard faculty against each other over discipline imposed on anthropology professor John Comaroff. Then a federal lawsuit made the full range of accusations against the professor and the university public. 



  • Notes from a Grad School Survivor

    by Kellen Heniford

    This week's revelations of sexual harassment and institutional complicity at Harvard are striking a chord with women academics because they're not surprising. The author discusses her own experiences and the power dynamics stacked against students and survivors.



  • The Tip of the Iceberg at Harvard?

    Just after 38 Harvard faculty penned an open letter of support for Professor John Comaroff, a lawsuit by three graduate students against him and the university was announced. The allegations describe a repeated pattern of harassment and institutional protection for an abuser.



  • The Captive Photograph

    by Ariella Azoulay

    The taking of photographs of enslaved people by Harvard scientist Louis Agassiz, and the university's continued ownership of those images, constitute a crime against humanity, argues a theorist and historian of visual culture. The images demand an ethic of care to replace an ethic of ownership, which is a model for restorative justice for slavery.



  • The Crimson Klan

    Harvard's administration treated the burning of a cross on Harvard Yard in 1952 as a "prank" and threatened Black students with disciplinary action if they described the incident to the press. A student journalist's research shows that the incident was not out of step with the university's practices in the 20th century. 



  • Who Owns the Evidence of Slavery’s Violence?

    by Thomas A. Foster

    A lawsuit demands that Harvard University give custody of famous images of enslaved men and women--taken without consent by a biologist seeking to demonstrate white supremacy-- to the subjects' descendents. A Howard University historian agrees, putting the images in context of other intimate violations endured by enslaved persons.