;

political history



  • Does History Show a Remedy for Dark Money?

    by Bo Blew

    Until 1969's Tax Reform Act, private foundations allowed the rich to influence policy and avoid taxation with haphazard oversight by the states. The new generation of independent political action groups needs similar federal oversight.



  • Are the Republicans Repeating the Mistake of 1998?

    by Steven M. Gillon

    The Republican congressional leadership pushed ahead with the impeachment of Bill Clinton to appeal to their right-wing base. The strategy backfired: the party failed to make any midterm gains and Newt Gingrich was overthrown as Speaker. Will a similar dynamic play out over abortion in 2022?



  • History Exposes the Fraud of Marco Rubio's Populism

    by Sean Wilentz

    The Florida senator engaged with an ingnominious tradition of disparaging expertise and knowledge as "elitist" when he condemned a meeting between President Biden and a number of historians, including the author. 



  • Mario Fiorentini (1918-2022): The Last Surviving Italian Partisan

    by David Broder

    After Nazi German occupied post-Mussolini Rome, Fiorentini escaped from prisons four times during twenty months of anti-Nazi struggle. He remained an important witness for a society prone to forgetting the horrors of far-right politics.



  • Review: Two Books on the Recent History of Polarization

    by Paul Starr

    Historian Michael Kazin and journalist Dana Milbank approach the nation's dire politics from the perspective of the two respective parties, Kazin examining the long conflicts within the Democratic party to create a broad and stable populist coalition, and Milbank examining the GOP's increasingly nihilistic efforts to break it up.


  • Kentucky Fried Vice President?

    by Cary Heinz

    Despite his advanced age, could chicken entrepreneur Colonel Harland Sanders have been an effective running mate for George Wallace's 1968 presidential campaign? Would he have been the ultimate celebrity politician?



  • Fanaticism May be Alarming, but It's Not New

    by Zachary R. Goldsmith

    The term "fanatic" evolved from a value-neutral name for participants in Roman religious cults to describe someone with dangerous and erroneous beliefs in religion and then in modern politics. Philosophers from Kant to Burke show the need to pull back from such absolute judgments of our adversaries. 



  • Review: Gerstle on Free Markets and Besieged Citizens

    by Robert Kuttner

    Gary Gerstle's new history aims to define the political order that began under Jimmy Carter and resulted in the overturning of New Deal liberalism for the empty promises of a market society, with the power of the state insulating capitalism from democracy.



  • Review Essay: Who Did Neoliberalism?

    by Erik Baker

    New books wrestle with the rise and collapse of the 1960s New Left and the gulf between its aspirations and achievements, and assess whether 1960s radical intellectuals are responsible for present-day neoliberalism. 



  • Rescuing Shirley Chisholm's Life from Symbolism

    by Anastasia Curwood

    Writing a biography of the Congresswoman and presidential candidate required working through the distinction between Shirley Chisholm the symbol and the much more complex reality of Shirley Chisholm the woman, to see how big trends in Black history unfolded at a human scale.