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higher education



  • Are Endowments Damaging Colleges and Universities?

    Trends in university endowment management include investing in exotic, illiquid, and difficult-to-value assets. This would have been unthinkable to endowment managers decades ago. Does it accomplish anything besides funnelling fees to financial consultants?



  • Open Season on the Faculty

    Despite evidence that liberal indoctrination in classrooms is rare, state legislatures are proceeding with bills that would restrict professors' freedom to teach some subjects and in the case of Iowa to survey the political affiliations of faculty at state institutions. 



  • We Were the Last of the Nice Negro Girls

    by Anna Deavere Smith

    The playwright and performance artist Anna Deavere Smith recalls her educational experiences at a small historically white college during the Civil Rights era, and the way the campus climate spurred her fellow Black students to develop a distinct identity. 



  • Biden Has a Unique Opportunity to Undo Years of Education Inequality

    by Crystal R. Sanders

    Segregated state higher education systems long neglected the responsibility to support graduate and professional education for Black residents, to the point of funding scholarships to send Black students out of state rather than allow the growth of professional and graduate programs in their states. 



  • Teaching in the Age of Disinformation

    Despite many professors' confidence in their ability to foster discussion of controversial subjects, studies suggest avoidance is a much more common approach. Historian of political rhetoric Jennifer Mercieca works to make students more direct and purposeful consumers of news. 



  • Two Visions of Higher Education Illuminate the Chasm between Harris and Pence

    by Marybeth Gasman and Adam Laats

    The Vice Presidential candidates' university affiliations--Harris's attendance at Howard and membership in a prominent Black sorority, and Pence's political affinity for Liberty University--show that both HBCUs and Evangelical colleges are important and politically significant parts of the American higher education system.



  • Disdain for the Less Educated Is the Last Acceptable Prejudice

    by Michael J. Sandel

    Joe Biden has a secret weapon in his bid for the presidency: He is the first Democratic nominee in 36 years without a degree from an Ivy League university. His campaign may test the pervasive belief that elite academic credentials are a necessity to govern.



  • Will Covid-19 Revive Faculty Power?

    Will the COVID crisis be the moment that seals the power of trustees, donors and administrators over universities organized like corporations, or will faculty organize to reassert shared governance?



  • What Is College For?

    by Steven Mintz

    Two new books argue for a robust and engaged humanistic study as indispensable to higher education. 



  • Back to School

    by François Furstenberg

    It’s not that university leaders necessarily want to open their campuses with new outbreaks looming in the fall. It’s that their business model leaves them no alternative.



  • The Campus Confederate Legacy We’re Not Talking About

    by Taulby Edmondson

    When a fraternity chapter sued him for defamation for remarking that it actively preserved the "Lost Cause" mythology of the Confederacy, the author went to the archives to defend himself.