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immigration



  • The Laundry Workers' Uprising and the Fight for Democratic Unionism

    by Jenny Carson

    African American and Black Caribbean immigrant women were key organizers of New York laundry workers who pushed for a union movement that rejected divisions of occupation, race and nationality in favor of workplace democracy. 



  • How Disinformation Powers Vigilantism

    Right wing misinformation has linked the nation's borders with race war discourse that encourages vigilantism, according to historian Carly Goodman. 


  • Bridget the Grocer and the First American Kennedys

    by Neal Thompson

    The history of the Irish immigrant Kennedys has long focused on its prominent men. A new book looks to JFK's grandmother Bridget Murphy Kennedy as the foundation of the family and a neglected figure for understanding immigration, urban life, and the changing of American politics.


  • The Nazi in the Classroom

    by Gary B. Ostrower

    American student Edward Sittler adopted German citizenship after the outbreak of World War II and became a Nazi propagandist. After the war, his past was revealed to the public and the Long Island college where he had been teaching German, launching a debate about citizenship, loyalty, and the limits of academic freedom.



  • The DC Punk Scene Relied on the Local Latinx Community

    by Mike Amezcua

    "A big piece is missing from the stories told about punk and hardcore in the 1980s: Primarily, that marginalized spaces and communities in urban America gave a stage to the predominantly white subculture."



  • The US Has Long Exploited the Legally Ambiguous Status of Guantanamo Bay

    by Jana Lipman

    The use of the naval base at Guantanamo bay for the detention of both suspected terrorists and refugees and migrants reflects the place's status as outside both Cuban and U.S. law. Since the end of the Spanish-American war, Cuban workers have understood the threat of abuse this status enables. 



  • In Zemmour, France's Old Bigotry Finds New Voice

    by Mitchell Abidor and Miguel Lago

    Presidential candidate Éric Zemmour's Jewishness should not be a shield for his manipulation of France's historical bigotries for political gain.



  • Boris Johnson’s Roman Fantasies

    by Mateusz Fafinsky

    Boris Johnson's recent statements that the collapse of Rome was caused by open borders are well out of step with historical understanding of the fragmenting of the Roman empire, but in line with a long legacy of political misappropriation of Rome as an allegory for the danger of immigrants.



  • History Answers the Inexplicable: Interview with Madeline Hsu

    by Shirley Lung

    "Asian Pacific Americans is a census category. It does not reflect the lived experiences, in fact, of many ethnic Asian persons living in the United States....But it is politically a necessity, in part because of the racial projects at work. These killings were racially motivated."



  • What America Owes Haitian Asylum Seekers

    by Michael Posner

    "The plight of the Haitians has been further complicated by decades of misrule, corruption and brutality by a series of Haitian governments that received steady U.S. financial and political support despite egregious records on human rights."


  • The Border and the Contingent Status of Mexican Workers

    by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

    In this excerpt from her new book "Not 'A Nation of Immigrants'," Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz argues that the politics of the border and the racialization of Mexican laborers has been a longstanding and glaring exception to the American myth of welcoming immigrants.