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1970s



  • Rescuing Shirley Chisholm's Life from Symbolism

    by Anastasia Curwood

    Writing a biography of the Congresswoman and presidential candidate required working through the distinction between Shirley Chisholm the symbol and the much more complex reality of Shirley Chisholm the woman, to see how big trends in Black history unfolded at a human scale.



  • We Got a Great Big Convoy

    by Dan Albert

    The media obscured the reality of recent protests in Ottawa and Washington by unquestioningly adopting a mythology of the North American trucker drawn from the 1970s when independent truckers had real grievances.



  • Betty Davis, Pioneering Queen of Funk, Dies at 77

    Her brief marriage to jazz great Miles Davis and ultimate withdrawal from the music business have overshadowed Betty Davis's legacy as a songwriter and performer with lasting influence beyond her album sales. 



  • The Four Secrets to Success for "Gonzo Journalism"

    by Peter Richardson

    Hunter S. Thompson's emergence as a major media figure came from the convergence of the souring of John F. Kennedy-style liberalism and collaborations with fellows like illustrator Ralph Steadman who launched HST's interpretive and visceral style as a critique of the Nixon years. 



  • Government Regulation is Necessary, but it has to be Smart

    by Paul Sabin

    Two legislative initiatives championed by the Carter administration show the challenge of balancing strong environmental regulation with administrative efficiency and accountability. The balance has, of course, been difficult to strike. 



  • Edsall: Abortion Has Always Been Part of Broader Politics

    Thomas Edsall draws on the work of historians Katherine Stewart, Randall Balmer, Jefferson Cowie and Darren Dochuk, plus other scholars, to argue that the "right to life" movement grew from the movement of resistance to school integration and today is sustained by politics of masculinity. 



  • The 70s are Back, But Not How You Think

    by Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff

    "In the coronavirus era, disco themes resonate. People long for community and wonder if leaders have our backs. Social media offers some of the trappings that defined disco — from the clothes to the allure of being seen in a new way."



  • Revisiting the 1976 Chowchilla School Bus Kidnapping

    The ordeal of 26 children and their school bus driver in California's San Joaquin Valley highlighted the conflicts between rural California and the state's urban centers, class conflict, and the rising fear of crime in 1976. 



  • How White Liberals Destroyed the 1970s’ Soul City

    by Brentin Mock

    The new book "Soul City: Race, Equality, and the Lost Dream of an American Utopia," by Seton Hall Law School professor Thomas Healy, explores the history of how and why Floyd McKissick’s experiment came to be, and its unceremonious end. 



  • Getting to Freedom City (Review)

    by Robin D.G. Kelley

    Historian Robin Kelley reviews Mike Davis and Jon Weiner's "Set the Night on Fire," which chronicles the growth of resistance to inequality and miltarized policing in 1960s Los Angeles.



  • Overlooked No More: Valerie Solanas, Radical Feminist Who Shot Andy Warhol

    Solanas was a radical feminist (though she would say she loathed most feminists), a pioneering queer theorist (at least according to some) and the author of “SCUM Manifesto,” in which she argued for the wholesale extermination of men.



  • A Racist Attack on Children Was Taped in 1975. We Found Them.

    The Times located a number of the black children assaulted by white teens during an anti-integration march in Queens in 1975. The incident was just one part of an organized and often violent effort by white Rosedale residents to prevent racial integration.