;

education history



  • Have Children Changed in Modern America?

    by Steven Mintz

    A recent argument for the general stability of children over the last century and a half misses the key point that "childhood" has been a fluid concept, and changes in how childhood is understood has necessarily affected the experiences of children. 



  • America's School Funding is Kleptocracy in Action

    by Esther Cyna

    The American system of funding schools largely through local property taxes contributes to inequalities both obvious and subtle that amount to legal dispossession of poor and minority students by denying them access to quality education. 



  • Who Gets to Be American?

    by Jonna Perrillo

    Johann Tschinkel, a Nazi scientist, was recruited by the United States after the war. His reflections on his educational experiences in Germany and those of his children in segregated American schools, offer a warning about the efforts to control the social studies curriculum today. 



  • Adults Support Empowering Youth – Until Youth Dissent

    by Dara Walker

    American youth are seldom credited for having a clear understanding of the policies that affect their lives. COVID safety walkouts are the latest example of student activism to be dismissed.



  • Reducing Child Poverty Is a No-Brainer even Without Brain Science

    by Mical Raz

    Reducing child poverty is a good in itself; justifying policies to reduce poverty in terms of improvements in measures of cognition or IQ scores makes such programs vulnerable to backlash and risks validating racist and eugenicist arguments about race and intelligence.



  • School Vandalism Is a Test We Need to Pass

    by Campbell F. Scribner

    Student vandalism in schools is nothing new. Effective responses must reject surveillance and punishment and put student growth above the simple protection of property.



  • Indentured Students: Elizabeth Tandy Shermer on Student Debt (Monday, October 4)

    Elizabeth Tandy Shermer shows that Democrats and Republicans intentionally wanted to create a student loan industry instead of generously funding colleges and universities, which eventually left millions of Americans drowning in student debt. Zoom, Monday, Oct. 4, 4:00 PM EDT.



  • Black American Educators: New Laws Silence Us

    Historians of education and civil rights suggest that Black teachers may be justified in fearing that new content-based restrictions on teaching history may subject them to more disciplinary action than their white colleagues.