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health care



  • Black Health Care, Black Art: A Texas Perspective

    by Celeste Henery

    Oral histories from Black health care practitioners shed important light on how they and the communities they served understood health and treatment, and speak to the ongoing problems Black Americans report in accessing good and compassionate care. 



  • Our Insurance Dystopia

    by Caley Horan

    America's health insurance morass is a result of the replacement of the ideal of mutual, universal risk sharing with the privatization of risk in pursuit of profit. 



  • A DARPA for Health? Think Again, President Biden

    by Victoria A. Harden

    The founder of the Office of NIH History says that the Biden Administration is right to urge a national commitment to health-related research, but shouldn't bother with creating a special task-focused agency; the best support is more and more secure funding for basic research.



  • The Health Care Crucible (Review)

    Gabriel Winant's "The Next Shift" examines the shift from industrial manufacturing toward care work as the economic base of the Rust Belt, where profit comes from treating the old, sick, and poor of one generation of the working class through the labor of the next generation.



  • Manufacturing Isn’t Coming Back. Let’s Improve These Jobs Instead

    by Gabriel Winant

    Instead of focusing on infrastructure projects, the federal government should act to improve the pay and working conditions of medical and care workers, who have been a growing share of the American working class for decades. This would make poorer and older Americans healthier as well. 



  • Economic Reforms Might Be The Best Health-Care Reforms

    by Evelynn M. Hammonds and Susan M. Reverby

    Only by understanding and confronting this entangled web of racism and public health can we actually solve a problem that has been centuries in the making.



  • Front-Line Workers in the Covid-19 Fight Need Unions

    by William P. Jones

    Without strengthening labor laws, and extending them to all sectors, we cannot ensure workers have the power to protect their own health and safety on the job and the health and safety of our communities.

  • Seeking the Good Death

    by Emily K. Abel

    Pediatric ward, University of Pennsylvania Hospital, 1907.Although most terminally ill Americans define a good death as one that occurs at home surrounded by family, a high proportion of people die alone in hospitals, tethered to machines. And many high technology treatments administered to dying patients impose enormous financial costs and inflict additional suffering without significantly extending life.