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historic preservation



  • Scientists Decipher Marie Antoinette's Redacted Love Notes

    “It’s always exciting when you discover that you can know more about the past than you thought you could,” said historian Rebecca L. Spang, who studies the French Revolution at Indiana University and was not involved in the study.



  • The Curious Task of Preserving Darwin's Beans and Butterflies

    Although his voyage to the Galapagos is famous, much of Darwin's work on natural selection was based on correspondence with horticulturalists and naturalists who sent him samples from around the world. Cambridge University's libraries are at work to preserve that correspondence.


  • See a Piece of History: Retired FDNY Fireboat John D. McKean

    The Fireboat McKean Preservation Project and the Hudson River Parks Friends offer those in New York the opportunity to visit the McKean at Pier 25 in lower Manhattan. The McKean's half-century of service most notably included evacuation and firefighting support on 9/11. 



  • Uncovering and Protecting the Black History of Nantucket

    by Tiya Miles

    "Although the Black community of New Guinea has passed into history, its mark on the landscape remains, a reminder that Nantucket was once a place of working-class ingenuity and Black daring."



  • Why Has Australia’s History Been Left To Rot?

    Historians are criticizing the Australian government's decision not to supply the funding the National Archives needs to digitize and preserve fragile and deteriorating documents, calling the "digital cliff" a potential national embarrassment. 



  • How a Plan to Save Buildings Fell Apart

    The imperatives of historic preservation are often at cross-purposes with the goals of community organizations. Does the failure of one preservation plan in Chicago offer lessons for the future?



  • University Finds 18th-Century Schoolhouse Where Black Children Learned to Read

    The discovery of a 260-year-old structure with such a deep connection to a little-known chapter of the history of Colonial Williamsburg, when the population was more than 50 percent Black and teaching slaves to read was legal, is especially significant, said history professor Jody Lynn Allen.