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Philadelphia



  • The Shocking MOVE Bombing was Part of a Broader Pattern of Anti-Black Racism

    by J.T. Roane

    The Philadelphia Police Department bears responsibility for the deadly bombing of the rowhouse occupied by MOVE members, but the carnage shows a long pattern of indifference by multiple municipal departments to the health, safety, and quality of life of Black residents in the 1970s and 1980s. 



  • Princeton Owes the Families of the MOVE Bombing Victims Answers

    by Judith Weisenfeld, Ruha Benjamin et al.

    Members of the Princeton faculty argue that "the victims of the MOVE bombing, their families, and those of us at Princeton invested in Black history and communities deserve more" than the university's statements to date about the use of remains of the victims. 



  • The MOVE Bombing and the Callous Handling of Black Remains

    by Jessica Parr

    The remains of the victims of the Philadelphia Police Department's bombing of the MOVE organization in 1985, including two children, were acquired by the University of Pennsylvania, stored outside of climate control, passed on to Princeton, and eventually lost, a final indignity to the victims. 



  • What Happens to News When Journalists and Historians Join Forces

    How the Philadelpia Inquirer teamed up with Villanova University’s Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest and the Lenfest Center for Cultural Partnerships to research three issues--infrastructure, immigration, and the opioid crisis--that could benefit from a historical perspective.



  • A Revolutionary museum opens in Philadelphia

    For the past 10 years, figuring out how to unfurl the drama of the American Revolution has been the task of R. Scott Stephenson. As vice president of exhibitions, collections and programming, he has examined 3,000 artifacts, many from the Valley Forge Historical Society.