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feminism



  • What Does it Mean to Call Someone a "Male Chauvinist Pig"?

    by Julie Willett

    Merging the term "chauvinism" from the old left and the radical 1960s desire to render authority grotesque, the term emerged with the second wave of feminism. But today some of the sexists labeled with it appear to have turned it into a badge of honor. 



  • The Way it Was

    "That year in the 1960s, several thousand American women were treated in emergency rooms for botched abortions, and there were at least 200 known deaths.Comparing my story with others from the pre-Roe era, what impresses me is how close I veered to mortal danger."



  • Who Lost the Feminist Movement's "Sex Wars"?

    by Amia Srinivasan

    As a new book reconsiders the debates among feminists over sexuality and pornography by emphasizing the role of liberalism in reducing the radical demands both sides made for the remaking of relations between men and women to narrow issues of law and civil liberties, that history resonates with current controversies about the place of trans women in the feminist movement.



  • Simone de Beauvoir's Lost Novel of Early Love

    “I loved Zaza with an intensity which could not be accounted for by any established set of rules and conventions,” Beauvoir recalled in her memoirs, almost thirty years after her friend’s death. 



  • The Phony Feminism of War Cheerleaders

    by Natalie Shure

    "The fact that Afghan women really do face immense oppression makes their cynical use for war-stoking purposes almost unfathomably galling," argues Natalie Shure.



  • What Connects 2021's "Stillwater" and 1979's "Norma Rae"?

    by Aimee Loiselle

    Both Amanda Knox, an American student accused of murder in Italy, and Crystal Lee Sutton, the southern labor organizer portrayed in "Norma Rae," have challenged the way that Hollywood films have reinterpreted their stories for commercial gain. 



  • How Domestic Labor Became Infrastructure

    Writer Moira Donegan argues that including funding for care workers in the infrastructure bill is eminently reasonable; feminist intellectuals for decades have argued that this work is essential to the broader economy, so funding it and supporting it makes sense economically and to recognize the labor of women. 



  • The Trouble with Charlotte Perkins Gilman

    by Halle Butler

    The resurrection of Charlotte Perkins Gilman's literary stature in the 1970s ran counter to the author's own self-understanding, summed up in her statement "I abominate being called a feminist." It also obscured her racist nativism. 



  • The Lockdown Showed How the Economy Exploits Women. She Already Knew

    Silvia Federici's critique of the exploitatitve nature of domestic labor as the backbone of capitalist economies is beginning to gain traction as homes are converted to schools and (paid) workplaces, compounding gendered burdens borne mostly by women in America. 



  • 50 Years On, the Feminist Press Is Radical and Relevant

    A look back at the ongoing work of the Feminist Press and the legacy of founder Florence Howe, who saved the work of many women authors from obscurity and helped support the emerging study of literature by women. 



  • Musing on Gender Integration in the Military with Simone de Beauvoir

    by Bill Bray

    For those engaged in the military gender integration debate today, de Beauvoir’s writing offers an additional reminder — those arguing against more integration may be no less intelligent and sincere than those championing change. But they still may be wrong.



  • A Naked Statue for a Feminist Hero?

    "Ms. Hambling’s sculptural woman — perched above a plunge of mountainous form — seems to embody the epic saga that so many women have endured for their voices to be heard."



  • Monstrous Men: The Medusa #MeToo Monument Has an Oedipal Complex

    by Erin Thompson and Sonja Drimmer

    A New York statue of Medusa erected as a monument to the #MeToo movement of identifying sexual abusers of women is in fact yet another instance of fighting among male artists using women's bodies as symbolic weapons. It also garbles the myth of Medusa, draining it of its relevance to #MeToo.