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Martin Luther King Jr.



  • What "Structural Racism" Means

    by Jamelle Bouie

    The writings of Oliver Cromwell Cox challenged the midcentury liberal conception of racism as a caste problem by linking it to capitalist exploitation and material inequality. He profoundly influenced Martin Luther King Jr.'s social critique and offers a way out of the dead end of "wokeness" and "identity politics."



  • Misappropriating MLK in the Critical Race Theory Debate

    by Tyler D. Parry

    Selective readings of Martin Luther King's writing and speeches swap his radical critiques of capitalism, militarism and inequality for bland colorblindness. The fact is that "CRT" is deeply rooted in King's work, which was unpopular among white Americans in his own time. 



  • Martin Luther King Knew: Fighting Racism Meant Fighting Police Brutality

    by Jeanne Theoharis

    Despite contemporary efforts to portray contemporary movements like Black Lives Matter and radical groups like the Black Panther Party as deviators from the "respectable" movement led by MLK, the SCLC leader insisted on the need to combat police brutality despite the unpopularity of that position,



  • Martin Luther King’s Giant Triplets of Injustice

    by Andrew Bacevich

    Without addressing the fundamental evils of economic inequality and militarism American society will continue to fail to realize the promise of racial equality, as Martin Luther King warned in his 1967 speech at Riverside Church. 



  • Using MLK to Quell Outrage Distorts His Legacy

    by Jeanne Theoharis

    King has much to say about our contemporary moment, about the persistence of police abuse and the power of disruption, which may account, at least partly, for why this aspect of his politics is considerably less recognized.



  • Martin Luther King Jr. Predicted This Moment

    by Gene Sperling

    Today, we are forced to confront the dissonance between our nation’s labeling of workers as “essential” and “heroes” and their limited wages, benefits and ability to organize.



  • What Street Names Say About Us

    A geographer who studies the civil rights movement told Deirdre Mask, “We have attached the name of one of the most famous civil rights leaders of our time to the streets that speak to the very need to continue the civil rights movement.”