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political violence



  • Another Tragic Eruption of "Great Replacement" Violence

    by Glenn C. Altschuler and Stuart M. Blumin

    "While the specific targets and methods of spreading this theory may be new, White native-born Americans worrying about being replaced is not. And history demonstrates that the theory has been repeatedly used to legitimize discrimination and deadly violence."



  • "Great Replacement" Shows how Many Americans Have Embraced Whites-Only Democracy

    by Adam Serwer

    Whether they blame a secret cabal of elites or the Democratic Party, proponents of "replacement" rhetoric share a belief that legitimate citizenship is racially exclusive and that legitimate elections require white voters to get what they want, echoing anti-immigrant and eugenics rhetoric of the early 20th century.


  • Historians on the Mainstreaming of the "Great Replacement" Myth

    by HNN Staff

    This conspiratorial claim of a plot by elites to replace whites with nonwhite and immigrant voters has moved from the far-right fringe to cable news and appears to have played a part in the radicalization of several mass shooters. Historians discuss what it is and what it means. 



  • Buffalo Mass Shooting Demands We Think About American Racism

    by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

    The gunman's manifesto shows the dangerous convergence on the right of anti-Black racism and a belief in white persecution. It also shows why the right is working so hard to fight teaching about racism in history classes. 



  • A Brief History of Violence in the Capitol

    Historian Joanne Freeman explains that the threat of violence has been a useful tool for minority factions in the government to thwart opposition, both in the pre-Civil War era and today.   



  • How Disinformation Powers Vigilantism

    Right wing misinformation has linked the nation's borders with race war discourse that encourages vigilantism, according to historian Carly Goodman. 



  • The Dangerous “Patriotism” of the January 6 Insurrection

    by Ben Railton

    The participants in the attack on the Capitol a year ago reflected a "mythic patriotism" founded on the belief in an authentic, white, Christian nation under attack by enemies dangerous enough to justify any measures in opposition.