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violence



  • The Right Celebrated Bernhard Goetz as the Kyle Rittenhouse of the 80s

    by Pia Beumer

    In the context of economic turmoil, urban crisis, and racial division, a broad swath of the American public made Goetz a heroic symbol of restored white masculinity after he shot four Black teens who asked him for money on the New York subway.



  • Monica Muñoz Martinez on the Border, Violence, and Uvalde

    Michelle Garcia, journalist, essayist, Soros Equality Fellow and Dobie Paisano writer-in-residence, and Monica Muñoz Martinez, associate professor of history at the University of Texas-Austin, talk about the border security apparatus at Uvalde, and the history of violence and discrimination at the South Texas and Mexican border.


  • There Oughtta Be a Law

    by Jim Zirin

    A veteran prosecutor weighs in on how American law must erase the distinction between "fully automatic" and "semiautomatic" weapons and ban the weapons that are used in massacre after massacre.



  • Teach Black History to Help Prevent Racist Violence

    by David Barber

    The state of Tennessee's efforts to restrict the teaching of African American history seek to prevent white students from developing a historical consciousness that would encourage them to reject white supremacy. 



  • Buffalo Shooting Exposes How History Shapes the Present

    by Chad Williams

    "Buffalo’s unique history of African American freedom, civil rights struggle and perseverance in the face of structural racism and economic neglect remind us of why Gendron targeted this particular community and why this shooting is especially heinous."



  • Don't Use Anti-Asian Violence to Throw More Money at Police

    by Crystal Jing Luo

    Business interests in Oakland have hijacked the safety concerns of Asian Americans to support arming police in service of real estate development that threatens low-income housing. 



  • The Sandy Hook Settlement Could Transform the Marketing of Guns

    by Tracy L. Barnett

    The settlement between Remington and the families of victims does not accept fault, but it does establish the dangerous connection between the marketing of guns as totems of masculinity and the damage done by young men who acquire them with ease.