;

black power



  • The Revolution that Wasn't: What did 1960s Radicals Achieve?

    by Michael Kazin

    A new book of narrative history of the 1960s New Left repeats a common error: mistaking rhetoric for revolution and ignoring a key outcome of the decade: that the right emerged more powerful, argues reviewer Michael Kazin. 



  • Learn Lessons about Movement Building from Radical Black Women

    by Keisha N. Blain, Premilla Nadasen and Robyn C. Spencer

    Barbara Ransby facilitates a roundtable collaborative essay about the role of women in building radical movements for justice in Black communities encompassing social welfare, economic security, police accountability, women's liberation and more. 



  • This Late Civil Rights Icon's Imprint Is Everywhere Today

    by Peniel E. Joseph

    "Stokely Carmichael's legacy spans the movement for Black power, the push for voting rights in the 21st century and the recent political campaigns that have given voice to those seeking more radical change."



  • Sounds of Freedom: The Music of Black Liberation

    Shana Redmond and Rickey Vincent discuss their research, which deals with the ways that musical expression has been integrated into the politics of Black freedom in different moments (and different musical styles, including the Black Panther Party's own funk band). 


  • Incognegro, Part II: How New York Law Enforcement Worked to Destroy Core

    by L.E.J. Rachell

    Ray Wood's memoir alleges that as a rookie NYPD detective he was coerced to act as an agent provocateur to convince members of New York's Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) chapters to commit crimes or other acts that would discredit and destroy the movement. The NYPD and FBI could clear the air by releasing their files on infiltration of Black-led organizations. 



  • For Many, an Afro isn’t Just a Hairstyle

    Journalist Ernie Suggs reflects on how hairstyles reflected his own family's history, with backing from historians Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham and Noliwe Rooks. 



  • How White Liberals Destroyed the 1970s’ Soul City

    by Brentin Mock

    The new book "Soul City: Race, Equality, and the Lost Dream of an American Utopia," by Seton Hall Law School professor Thomas Healy, explores the history of how and why Floyd McKissick’s experiment came to be, and its unceremonious end. 



  • The Danger Of Depoliticising Black Power Activism

    Both celebrities and consumer brands have appropriated the aesthetics of the Black Panther Party and other Black militants, without dealing with the substance of their politics. 



  • We Don’t Need Bill Clinton’s History Of Civil Rights

    by Erik Loomis

    Bill Clinton decided to use John Lewis’ funeral to take a shot at Stokely Carmichael. The last thing we need is whites to use such opportunities to tell histories of the civil rights movements that are used to make them feel comfortable.


  • The Fiftieth Anniversary of the Black Action Movement and the Way Forward

    by Martin Halpern

    Activists in today’s struggles against institutionalized racism and for black lives can benefit from studying a local victory of fifty years ago. In the spring of 1970, the Black Action Movement (BAM) at the University of Michigan led a thirteen-day strike that won a commitment to change by the university administration.


  • Who Killed Ralph Featherstone?

    by Peter Levy

    Reopening the investigation of the bombing deaths of Ralph Featherstone and William Payne at the fiftieth anniversary of the crime will shed further light on the dangers of unchecked government agencies and the shortcomings of the fifth estate.