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womens history



  • Black Women's Activism Ties Reproductive Rights to Broader Goals of Freedom

    by Kim Gallon

    Black women's reproductive lives have always been complicated by institutional racism, sexism, and the balance of personal autonomy and racial solidarity. Black feminists have struggled to use the African American press as a space to force discussion of the issues. 



  • "Misogynoir" Exemplified in the Degradation of Black Women Athletes

    by Donald Earl Collins

    The treatment of basketball star Brittney Griner by Russian authorities (and the indifference to her case by many Americans) shows that Black women athletes still have to navigate a world of racism and sexism that diminishes their achievements and their security. 



  • After Four Decades, Iranian Women's Frustrations are Erupting

    by Kelly J. Shannon

    Since the 1990s, Iranian women have been engaged in slowly escalating protest against the restrictions imposed by the Islamic Republic. Have those protests become too large and too public to be contained? 



  • "The Woman King" Softens Truths of the Slave Trade

    by Ana Lucia Araujo

    The film has a delicate task: showing the involvement of the Kingdom of Dahomey in selling other Africans to European slave traders without feeding narratives that blame Africans for the slave trade. It largely sidesteps this history instead. 



  • Where are the Women in History?

    by Amanda B. Moniz

    Women's histories have frequently been written in the past, but in ways that are inaccessible to researchers in the present. One example is the way that women reformers were presented as exemplars of Protestant evangelical rectitude. 



  • The Danger of Encouraging Americans to Inform on Each Other

    by Christine Adams

    Governors like Virginia's Glenn Youngkin are repeating a tactic of despots throughout history: encouraging the public to denounce individuals to the authorities. Whether its witches or teachers, this is a formula for intimidation and conformity. 


  • "Pour Myself a Cup of Ambition": The 1970s Echo in Today's Union Revival

    by Ellen Cassedy and Lane Windham

    This Labor Day, we’re hopeful about the renewed energy and excitement for workplace organizing—especially by women workers—and cautiously optimistic that today’s workers may overcome the sorts of corporate tactics that blocked organizing in the 1970s.



  • How Long Until We Hear "Madam President"?

    by Lindsay M. Chervinsky

    In the early republic, the perception of ambition was a negative for a political candidate, especially for president. That norm mostly survives today in its application to women candidates. 


  • Uncancel Wilma Soss

    by Robert E. Wright and Janice Traflet

    Wilma Soss defied norms as a woman who became independently wealthy through her PR agency and her investments, but the circumstances of her marriage and her outspoken advocacy for shareholders against corporate waste led to her erasure.  Her biographers hope to correct that. 



  • Safe Haven "Baby Boxes" are a Medieval Horror

    by Maria Laurino

    "As generations of twentieth-century Italian mothers and their children can attest, giving a woman no choice but to anonymously surrender her baby is a route to ruined lives."



  • Women Have Always Been at the Center of the Labor Movement

    by Amy Mackin

    The 1860 strike of male shoe workers in Lynn, Massachusetts floundered until the strikers allied with their female compatriots, but the movement largely failed to maintain gender unity. This lesson is critical for the service industry unions organizing today.