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womens history



  • How Private Equity Cashed in on Medical Abortion

    The American effort to bring the French RU-486 medication to the domestic market made medical abortion much more widely accessible. But, in true American fashion, the involvement of private investors looking for profit also made it much more expensive—even more so after Dobbs.



  • Anastasia Curwood on New Shirley Chisholm Bio

    By framing Chisholm as a person with a life history, Curwood elevates knowledge of the New York congresswoman from a "first major party candidate" to a political theorist and visionary. 



  • The Black Widows' Struggle for Civil War Pensions

    by Hilary Green

    Black women's struggles to claim pensions earned by their late husbands' service in the Union Army reflected the incomplete realization of freedom after emancipation and the intrusive controls the pension system and growing administrative state placed on Black families. 



  • 50 Years at Cook County Hospital Prove Abortion is Healthcare

    by Amy Zanoni

    Abortion rights activists have focused on horror stories of the pre-Roe era as cautionary tales, but the history of public hospitals since Roe shows that real reproductive freedom requires expanded access to care and a robust social safety net. 



  • "A League of Their Own" Update Engages Lives of Queer Women in the 1940s

    by Lauren Gutterman

    "The series’ portrait of queer life amid World War II might seem unrealistic to some, but history reveals that queer women and trans men — from butch to femme and married to unmarried — often found opportunities to act on their desires and build queer communities."



  • Witches are Having a Moment in 2022

    by Anna K. Danziger Halperin

    Women have long understood accusations of witchcraft as attacks on their efforts to exert power in their societies. This may explain why women today are embracing the symbol. 



  • Empathy in the Archive: Care and Disdain for Wet Nursing Mothers

    by Anna K. Danziger Halperin

    "Just like today, women’s decisions in the past about how to feed their babies were shaped by personal preference, to be sure, but the possibilities available are bounded by technological innovations, shifting medical advice, and social, cultural, and economic pressures and practices."