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teaching history



  • Book Bans Reflect Outdated Views on How Children Read

    by Trisha Tucker

    Research shows that children are not vessels into which books pour ideas, but co-creators of meaning as they read and process a book. Yet today's moral panic imagines books breaking down barriers between innocent childhood and a corrupt world. 



  • Eric Foner on the Study of History and Democracy

    "I’m always interested in the connections between past and present. The questions that interest me historically tend to come out of the moment I’m living in."



  • A Short History of Fake History, and Why We Fight for the Truth

    by Robert S. Mcelvanie

    One of the most important parts of the civil rights struggle was an interracial effort to fight against a narrative of fake history that had been institutionalized in and out of the Jim Crow South—the white supremacist mythology of the "lost cause." That legacy should guide schools today. 



  • Today's Book Bans Might be Most Dangerous Yet

    by Jonna Perrillo

    Today's book banners have broadened their attention from communist themes in textbooks and are attacking young adult literature titles that students are choosing to read, a much more significant intrusion on freedom of thought. 



  • Why the Right Hates History Now

    by Jonathan M. Katz

    Conservative intellectuals like L. Brent Bozell used to claim the authority of history because the saw it as a set of texts that affirmed the right of men like them to rule. Now that the field has changed, pundits like Bret Stephens have little use for it. 



  • The Complicity of Textbooks in America's Racism

    by Eric Foner

    Donald Yacovone is an inheritor of the legacy of WEB DuBois, slogging through the nation's history textbooks to identify the propaganda of white supremacy, says reviewer Eric Foner.


  • Society and Historical Memory: Six Common Ways People Relate to the Past

    by Andrew Joseph Pegoda

    Although historians are trained to think of the past in particular and disciplined ways, understanding how people en masse understand the past is also vital because these understandings—inaccurate as they often are—are vital and embody important information about their hopes and fears.



  • The Danger of Encouraging Americans to Inform on Each Other

    by Christine Adams

    Governors like Virginia's Glenn Youngkin are repeating a tactic of despots throughout history: encouraging the public to denounce individuals to the authorities. Whether its witches or teachers, this is a formula for intimidation and conformity. 



  • States Curtailing Students' Access to Books, Ideas

    In many states, school librarians will be less free to recommend books, and students less free to explore them, with potentially serious consequences for educational quality and personal and intellectual growth, experts argue. 



  • The Virginia History that Conservatives are Suppressing

    by Kevin M. Levin

    Conservatives appointed by Glenn Youngkin to the state Board of Education are ignoring the important history of the Readjusters—a biracial party that governed in the tumultuous era between the end of Reconstruction and the consolidation of Jim Crow. Students need to know about them. 



  • The Context of the New History Wars is Our Missing Sense of a Shared Past

    by Jonathan Zimmerman

    Grievances over secular issues like teaching racism have replaced Christian concerns over evolution and prayer in the battles over curriculum. Have advocates of progressive curricula opened the door to this attack by undermining a shared national historical narrative? 



  • Fighting Back Against Book Banners

    by Margaret Sullivan

    Attempts to ban books from public libraries are a threat to democratic culture and should alarm all Americans, argues Post columnist Margaret Sullivan.