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Georgia



  • The Odd Place of one Savannah Neighborhood in the History of Redlining

    by Todd Michney

    The history of the Cuyler-Brownville area shows that HOLC risk assessments and Federal lending practices were responsive to local banks' perception of lending risk and desire for profit, factors which resulted in the rarity of an African American community retaining a "green" rating. 


  • Under Columbus, Georgia: What Folklore Erases

    by Bryan Banks

    Subterranean tunnels under Columbus, Georgia have been repurposed as part of dramatic stories of crime, emancipation, and war, tales which obscure the more prosaic and violent aspects of the town's history. 



  • Her Family Owned Slaves. How Can She Make Amends?

    "For almost three years now, with the fervor of the newly converted, Ms. Marshall has been on a quest that from the outside may seem quixotic and even naïve. She is diving into her family’s past and trying to chip away at racism in the Deep South, where every white family with roots here benefited from slavery and almost every Black family had enslaved ancestors."



  • If It’s Not Jim Crow, What Is It?

    by Jamelle Bouie

    NYT Columnist Jamelle Bouie relies on the historical writing of J. Morgan Kousser, who showed that disenfranchisement after 1877 affected African American and poor white southerners, was implemented through color-blind means, and had partisan, rather than simply racial, goals. But it was still Jim Crow, and the comparison to Georgia's new law is fair and valid. 



  • The Painful History of the Georgia Voting Law

    by Jason Morgan Ward

    The new wave of vote suppression bills, like the one in Georgia, reflect a less obvious but important aspect of Jim Crow law: the use of superficially race-neutral language to keep specific groups from voting. The danger is that courts today will similarly fail to see these bills for what they are. 



  • What Jim Crow looks like in 2021

    by Nicole Hemmer

    The most relevant aspect of Jim Crow today isn't the Klan, but the "color blind" legislation that Southern conservatives used to circumvent the Fifteenth Amendment. 



  • New Bills Target Stone Mountain, Confederate Monuments Across Georgia

    Two bills would act to broadly prohibit the maintenance or construction of Confederate monuments except in museums or on Civil War battlefields and authorize the state-chartered agency that maintains Stone Mountain Park to remove or modify the park's massive bas relief tribute to Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis. 



  • What Julian Bond Taught Me About Politics and Power

    by Jeanne Theoharis

    A student of Congressman Julian Bond and a biographer of Rosa Parks, Jeanne Theoharis describes how those two figures demonstrated the real political story behind the mythologized civil rights movement. 



  • How Alvin the Beagle Helped Usher in a Democratic Senate

    On the surface, Raphael Warnock's campaign ads featured a cute beagle. But they reflected a calculated – and successful – effort to counter racial dynamics in Georgia politics to bring about a historic victory. 



  • Georgia’s New Senators will Write the Next Chapter in Black-Jewish Relations

    by Jeff Melnick

    The history of the Leo Frank trial and lynching shows that, while both groups have faced prejudice and discrimination, "the glory of Black-Jewish relations has always been more aspirational than achieved." Georgia's two new senators have a chance to advance a coalition for progress and equity.