Shanghai comes to terms with British colonial 'century of humiliation'





Since the Communist party came to power in 1949, it has worked hard to remove traces of the time when the city was carved up into concessions run by the British, French, Americans and Japanese.

History textbooks refer to the "century of humiliation" that China endured at the hands of foreigners after it lost the Opium War of 1840.

The elegant two-floor building at number 33 on the Bund, Shanghai's historic waterfront, was at the heart of British trade and interests in China.

Behind it lay the Bund Garden, an acre of green space landscaped by an imported Scottish gardener.

The consulate, and the consul's residence next door, were built in 1873 and are some of the oldest buildings still standing on the Bund.

After the British gave up the concession, the complex was used by Chinese bureaucrats but it fell into disrepair after being abandoned.

Now a project is under way to renovate the buildings and to use them to entertain visiting politicians and dignitaries.



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