Belgrano survivors remember sinking





It was perhaps the most controversial episode of the Falklands War and brought its single heaviest loss of life.

Thirty years later, the sinking of the General Belgrano cruiser, with the deaths of 323 Argentine crewmen, still arouses deep emotions and fierce debate.

Despite its advancing years, the vessel was the most potent in the junta's navy. After it was sunk on May 2, 1982, by two torpedoes fired by HMS Conqueror, a nuclear-powered Royal Navy submarine, no Argentine vessel left port again during the conflict.

The government of President Cristina Kirchner has made the anniversary the deadline for its threat to international oil companies that it will take action against them for "illegally operating" in Falkland waters....

Across the country, meanwhile, ex-combatants are marking the 30th anniversary with ceremonies of remembrance. For Ruben Volpe and Gustavo Altoe, emotions will be particularly raw – as teenage conscripts on national service, they were among 770 survivors rescued from life rafts.

The vessel had entered the British 200-mile exclusion zone around the islands on May 1, but left the next day and was sailing away when it was hit, said Mr Volpe, a naval artilleryman....



comments powered by Disqus

Subscribe to our mailing list